Contact Us Host an Event Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Monday - May 04, 2015

From: San Antonio, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Diseases and Disorders, Grasses or Grass-like
Title: Effect of heavy rains on Lindheimer Muhly
Answered by: Guy Thompson

QUESTION:

It is April 2015, in San Antonio we've had very heavy rains recently. My Lindheimer muhly, which was looking beautiful, has now turned brown all over. Is this normal or is this a problem?

ANSWER:

I suspect that the Muhlenbergia lindheimeri (Lindheimer's muhly) was waterlogged for too long during the rains.  Some Internet websites, such as this, mention that this grass tolerates only short periods of soil saturation.  

Your muhly may not have survived this rainy spell.  But watch the plant closely to see if it shows signs of a comeback in the form of a few green leaves protruding from the base  It might be a good idea to cut off the dead leaves to get a better view of any new leaves.  Also check the bed where the plant is located.  You may want to consider installing a French drain or mixing decomposed granite into the soil to improve drainage during future heavy rain.

 

More Grasses or Grass-like Questions

Plants for steep slope in Virginia
October 24, 2008 - Please help! Looking for landscaping ideas for a very large Steep hill. Features: slope is approximately 45-60 degrees, clay soil mixed with fill dirt, lots of deer, partial sun, seeking minimal maint...
view the full question and answer

Identification of native grasses little bluestem and switchgrass
August 09, 2007 - If you drive east of Austin on Hwy 71, there is a bluish looking grass that has become very noticeable since the heavy rains in July. The blades grow straight up and each plant is in clump form. Do ...
view the full question and answer

Use of Turffalo in Possum Kingdom TX
June 27, 2013 - Hello, we will be building a retirement home in the hillside area of Possum Kingdom Lake which currently has cactus, cedar, and some live oaks. Our intention is to keep most of the 8 acres natural wi...
view the full question and answer

Can fibrous roots of Chasmanthium latifolium damage house foundation
May 03, 2013 - Dear Mr.Ms. S-P, Can the fibrous roots of inland sea oats cause foundation problems? I was digging around my foundation and found a root about 1" in diameter that I am afraid might be from sea oa...
view the full question and answer

Replacing junipers on slope with wildlife garden
October 23, 2008 - Gradual replacement of Juniper with natives? We have a 10 foot deep slope with less than a 45 degree angle that is all covered with old, overgrown Juniper. It does not appear to serve any purpose ...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.