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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Monday - May 11, 2015

From: Elgin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Poisonous Plants, Trees
Title: Fruit and nut trees safe for horses.
Answered by: Joe Marcus

QUESTION:

My husband and I just moved to Elgin. We have always wanted to grow fruit/nut baring trees but didn't take in to consideration that horses might eat them. We have never had land or horses before, so we are learning a lot. What can we plant that the horses won't eat?

ANSWER:

Horses are likely to browse on leaves and bark and to rub on just about any tree within their reach, especially if they're bored.  You will need to erect horse-proof barriers around any young trees you plant.  

You should not plant cherries, peaches, apricots or plums anywhere near where you plan to keep horses.  Nor should you ever feed the foliage of these trees to your horses.  Likewise, you should not grown Black Walnut anywhere near horses.  However, Pecan is safe for horses, though horses may not be safe for young pecans.  For a much more thorough discussion, there are any number of lists of trees and other plants toxic to horses published on-line.

 

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