Contact Us Host an Event Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Monday - March 16, 2015

From: Graham, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Plant Identification, Edible Plants, Trees
Title: Identity of wild plum in Childress County, Texas
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I have a Wild Plum follow up question. My wife grew up around the Childress TX area. She remembers going around the creeks and gathering Wild Plums for her mother as a child. Would you have any idea what type of Wild Plums she found there? She also remembers that they were like in thickets.

ANSWER:

My guess is that it is Prunus angustifolia (Chickasaw plum).  This is the only plum species that is shown on the distribution map on the USDA Plants Database as occurring in Childress County.  It is described as a "twiggy, thicket-forming tree" that can grow 15-30 feet tall.  Here is more information from TAMU Aggie Horticulture and Missouri Botanical Garden.

Another plum species, Prunus gracilis (Oklahoma plum), occurs in adjacent Collingsworth County.  It is also thicket-forming but its height as listed as 1.5 to 6 feet.  See the USDA Plants Database distribution map.  Here is more information TAMU Aggie Horticulture and Oklahoma University Biosurvey.

 

From the Image Gallery


Chickasaw plum
Prunus angustifolia

Oklahoma plum
Prunus gracilis

More Edible Plants Questions

Plant identification
August 04, 2012 - We found a bush on our ranch in southern Gonzales County. It has oval shaped leaves about an inch long. There are no thorns on the branches. Fruit is round and smooth, the size of a small cherry to...
view the full question and answer

Dog eats Celtis laevigata, sugar hackberry
May 21, 2012 - This is an odd question but I am a biologist and have for years notice an odd behavior in my Golden Retriever. When he gets stomach distress or something makes him nervous like an incoming thunderstor...
view the full question and answer

Fruit trees for West Virginia
March 13, 2010 - What kinds of fruit trees would grow best in West Virginia? I assume apple trees would, but what kind of apple tree and are there any others that would grow well?
view the full question and answer

Is Texas Thistle edible from Austin
May 26, 2010 - Is Texas Thistle an edible plant?
view the full question and answer

Who ate the Jack-in-the-Pulpit in Ontario?
July 07, 2009 - Something has dug up my clump of Jack-in-the-pulpit at my parents' cottage in the Haliburtons (Ontario, Canada). Leaves, berries and roots are gone. We know we have a black bear who likes our compo...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.