Contact Us Host an Event Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Saturday - September 13, 2014

From: Chippewa Falls, WI
Region: Midwest
Topic: Seeds and Seeding, Herbs/Forbs
Title: When to Collect Rudbeckia triloba Seed?
Answered by: Anne Van Nest

QUESTION:

How soon after flowering may I cut Rudbeckia triloba flower heads to save seeds? Do cones need to be attached to the plant in or out of the ground to continue to mature?

ANSWER:

Rudbeckia triloba (browneyed Susan)is a beautiful native wildflower and The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center has information in our Native Plant Database that will help answer your question. If the cones are nearing maturity, you can remove them from the plant. Tie a paper bag round the seed heads and hang them upside down in a warm, dry location. The cones should continue to mature and open up, releasing the seed into the paper bag.  

Here's some information on Rudbeckia triloba from the Native Plant Database...

Rudbeckia triloba propagates very easily from seed sown in fall or spring. Large plants with numerous overlapping basal leaves, all from a single woody crown, may be divided in late winter or early spring.


Seed Collection: The nutlets turn charcoal-gray at maturity, usually 3-4 weeks after the bloom period. Seeds are mature at this time, but they are easier to collect after cones lose their tight compact stucture. Store dry in sealed, refrigerated containers.

 

From the Image Gallery


Browneyed susan
Rudbeckia triloba

Browneyed susan
Rudbeckia triloba

Browneyed susan
Rudbeckia triloba

More Seeds and Seeding Questions

Seeds for India from Guilderland NY
August 15, 2010 - I have Green Cross “Non Profitable” trust in TamilNadu India. We are looking for free seeds from Government and other NGO foundations. Moto: Global Vowing awareness program and our volunteers help ...
view the full question and answer

Germination of bluebonnet seeds in Hempstead, TX
April 01, 2008 - We scattered 20 lbs of bluebonnet seeds on our property near Hempstead. Only about 10 plants have come up even though on another part of the property we have thousands. It is well drained and in sun....
view the full question and answer

Mail order source for Guaiacum angustifolium from Ft. Worth TX
April 16, 2014 - Do you have a mail order source for the seeds of Guaiacum angustifolium? I have looked extensively and cannot find one. Thank you!
view the full question and answer

Information about growing mountain laurels (Sophora secundiflora)
November 15, 2008 - I live just outside of Austin on 10 acres. I have several very large mountain laurels on my property that I planted from containers. Mine flower profusely every year. I feed them bi-weekly and wate...
view the full question and answer

Native lawn grass for Seabrook TX
March 12, 2013 - We want to seed our lawn in Seabrook, Tx.77586 with a Natural Grass replacing our St. Augustine Grass. I think there is one that is drought resistant (only water it twice a month.) and that does not g...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.