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A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Sunday - July 27, 2014

From: Albuquerque, NM
Region: Southwest
Topic: Seeds and Seeding, Herbs/Forbs
Title: Looking for seeds for Carex texensis and Horse Herb
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

I am looking for either plants or seeds of Carex texensis and horseherb with no success. I live in the Albuquerque,NM mountain region (at ~6800ft, zone 6). I need something that is very dought resistant and loves shade, especially beneath old beautiful pinon trees. Am I looking in the right direction with these plants and if so, where can I find some? If not, any other ideas? Thanks!

ANSWER:

Carex texensis Carex texensis (Texas sedge) is one of the most common sedges in central Texas, but the USDA distribution map doesn’t show it occurring in New Mexico. This link to Native Seed Network  indicates that the seed are not commercially available. It’s NPIN page indicates that it can be propagated by means of root division.

Horse Herb Calyptocarpus vialis (Straggler daisy) is another shade-tolerant ground cover, but its distribution does not include Bernalillo County.

My recommendation is that you contact the New Mexico Native Plant Society and hopefully you can find some one who has these plants who will give you transplants.

 

 

From the Image Gallery


Texas sedge
Carex texensis

Texas sedge
Carex texensis

Horseherb
Calyptocarpus vialis


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