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Past Issues Of Wildflower Magazine

Wildflower is published quarterly by the Wildflower Center. Its content is national in scope with articles about the conservation and use of native plants as well as news from the Wildflower Center. A subscription is provided to Wildflower Center members as a benefit of membership.

Put Into Focus - Fall 2013

WINNERS Of THE 2013 WILDFLOWER/TEXAS HIGHWAYS PHOTO CONTEST

PHOTOGRAPHER ELLIOTT ERWITT once said, “Nothing happens when you sit at home. I always make it a point to carry a camera with me at all times…” With our fourth-annual photography contest, we hoped to get people out of their homes with cameras in hand.

We think we’ve done it. Nearly 1,300 photographs were entered this year in five categories: Botanical, People with Wildflowers, Landscape, Wildlife in the Native Landscape and newcomer The Native Landscape at the Wildflower Center. As eager as our entrants were, the voters were even more enthusiastic. In our second year of public voting, 23,000 votes were cast this year – 10,000 more than last year.

After public-vote winner Carrol Fibich was announced in May, our panel of judges narrowed entries down to 50 finalists. Some of the winners were obvious to us all right away; others took much discussion. There were surprises: such as two black-and-white photographs being chosen as winners during the first year in which we had no black-and-white category.

Congratulations to all our winners, and thank you to everyone who entered and voted!

1ST PLACE, THE NATIVE LANDSCAPE AT THE WILDFLOWER CENTER

Windy Picture

1ST PLACE, THE NATIVE LANDSCAPE
AT THE WILDFLOWER CENTER.   Steven Schwartzman – a 2010 contest winner – typically composes photographs in such a way that human elements don’t intrude on nature. Our new category – The Native Landscape at the Wildflower Center – gave him a chance to include a human element for a change. Schwartzman got down low to isolate this structure’s glinting metal against the blue of a sky that also happened to have wispy clouds across it. He was attracted to a bright group of damianita (Chrysactinia mexicana) that was in full flower. “In order to include those relatively low plants, I lay on the ground and strained, even with a wideangle lens set to an aperture of f/16, to fit everything in and keep both the flowers and the sculpture in focus.” Jim LaPaso’s “Wild” flower sculpture was on display at the Wildflower Center this spring.
 

2ND PLACE THE NATIVE LANDSCAPE AT THE WILDFLOWER CENTER

Mellow Shellow

  Tom Barton entered this winning picture because he thought it funny to see all those turtles piled on top of one another with necks straining to get to the sun. An amateur photographer, Barton has been a member of the Wildflower Center since moving to Central Texas in 2012.
 

1ST PLACE LANDSCAPE

Trestle Mania

2ND PLACE LANDSCAPE   The Mexican Canyon Trestle has been in Cloudcroft, New Mexico, since 1889. Struck by the way it appeared amidst the pine and aspen trees, Amanda O’Bryan photographed the scene with her Canon Rebel T3. She stumbled across the contest on our Facebook page and chose to enter this image since many of her friends had liked it. Turns out, so did we.
 

2ND PLACE LANDSCAPE

Field Of Visions

2ND PLACE LANDSCAPE   Old Baylor Park in Independence, Texas, is hailed as one of the best spots in the state to view springtime bluebonnets. Ruins that mark the site of the original Baylor University and Baylor Female College Campus distinguish the landscape. Graphic designer and photographer Eric Pohl says it’s a favorite spot to explore for wildflowers beyond bluebonnets – such as these greenthread (Thelesperma filifolium).
 

1ST PLACE, WILDLIFE IN THE NATIVE LANDSCAPE

The Lizard Of Aahs

2ND PLACE LANDSCAPE   Allen Brandenburg was photographing flowers in his Dripping Springs, texas, backyard when this anole appeared from behind tall grass. Lucky for him, the anole was not camera-shy and allowed Brandenburg to get several shots before he moved on. Brandenburg uses photography for documentation and illustration purposes in his work as an engineer but for pleasure enjoys photographing wildlife and flowers the most. 
 

2ND PLACE WILDLIFE IN THE NATIVE LANDSCAPE

Fowl Shot

2ND PLACE LANDSCAPE   Nature photographer Rick Higgins happened upon this great blue heron (Ardea herodias) at mealtime while visiting St. Mark’s National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Florida. More interested in the Atlantic blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) than avoiding having its picture taken, the heron stood very still – allowing Higgins to get this winning shot. Higgins is a scientist from Crawfordville, Florida, who spends his free time with camera in hand.
 

1ST PLACE BOTANICAL

Winner’s Cup

2ND PLACE LANDSCAPE   Anne Worner and her husband, John, have been Wildflower Center members for years, but this was the first year Anne entered our photography contest. She took this winning image at Inks Lake State Park in Burnet, texas, this April. the Norwegian native whose background is fine art found these claret cup cactus flowers (Echinocereus triglochidiatus) tucked away beneath a rock. the photo is an example of one of her favorite photography subjects – people, pets and plants.
 

2ND PLACE BOTANICAL

Oh, The Laces You’ll See!

  When stay-at-home mom of six Aimee Richmond finds a moment to herself, you’ll find a camera in her hand. Closeups of flowers and plants are her favorite, such as this lace cactus (Echinocerus reichenbachii). “I loved the symmetry of this cactus and converted it into black-and-white because it looked even more dramatic.”
 

WINNER, PEOPLE WITH WILDFLOWERS

Dog Heaven

2ND PLACE LANDSCAPE   On Easter Sunday, Jeanne Sparlin snapped this sweet picture of her 5-year-old grandson Garrett Smith and dog Jedi along the highway near her home in Georgetown, Texas. A retiree who takes pictures for fun, Sparlin has placed in the State Fair contest four times.
 

PEOPLE’S CHOICE

Crowning Acheivement

  Of the nearly 23,000 votes cast by the public for entries to this year’s contest, 4,239 were cast for this photograph – “Monarch on Butterfly Weed” by Carrol Fibich. A winner in the People with Wildflowers category last year, Fibich lives in Brookfield, Wisconsin. According to Fibich, the most gratifying part of winning was helping spread awareness about the plight of the monarch butterfly among those whom she encouraged to vote.
 

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