Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center - The University of Texas at Austin information

 Native Plant Database

Aesculus parviflora


Bottlebrush buckeye


Hippocastanaceae (Horse-Chestnut Family)



Aesculus parviflora (Bottlebrush buckeye)
Smith, R.W.
A distinctive small buckeye, bottlebrush is a mound-shaped, thicket-forming, deciduous shrub, 6-12 ft. tall, with picturesque, ascending, candelabra-like branching. Lowest branches are horizontal and often rest on the ground. Palmately-compound leaves turn from dark-green to yellow-green in fall. Tall, cylindric spikes of feathery white flowers with pink stamens and red anthers bloom in the heat of early summer after other eastern buckeyes have finished. The smooth nut is enclosed by a bright yellow husk.

Though susceptible to leaf scorch, bottlebrush is unique among the buckeyes for retaining its foliage, in good condition, well into fall. It is more tolerant of disease and insects than most buckeyes. Leaves may become quite colorful in fall; seemingly dependent on environmental conditions. Excellent for borders, as a specimen, or under shade trees.

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Plant Characteristics

Duration: Perennial
Habit: Shrub
Leaf Retention: Deciduous
Leaf Arrangement: Opposite
Leaf Complexity: Palmate
Leaf Margin: Serrate
Size Notes: Shrub up to 15 feet tall.
Flower:
Fruit:
Size Class: 6-12 ft.

Bloom Information

Bloom Color: White
Bloom Time: Jun , Jul

Distribution

USA: AL , GA , NJ , PA , SC , DC
Native Distribution: C. GA to AL & SC
Native Habitat: Rich, mesic woods; moist ravines

Growing Conditions

Light Requirement: Part Shade
Soil Description: Moist, well-drained, shallow soils over limestone or loamy sands.
Conditions Comments: Though susceptible to leaf scorch, bottlebrush is unique among the buckeyes for retaining its foliage, in good condition, well into fall. It is more tolerant of disease and insects than most buckeyes. Leaves may become quite colorful in fall; seemingly dependent on environmental conditions. Excellent for borders, as a specimen, or under shade trees.

Benefit

Use Wildlife: Flowers attract hummingbirds and butterflies.
Warning: Seeds and foliage of Aesculus species are poisonous to humans if eaten. Sensitivity to a toxin varies with a personís age, weight, physical condition, and individual susceptibility. Children are most vulnerable because of their curiosity and small size. Toxicity can vary in a plant according to season, the plantís different parts, and its stage of growth; and plants can absorb toxic substances, such as herbicides, pesticides, and pollutants from the water, air, and soil.
Interesting Foliage: yes

Last Update: 2013-09-08