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Fire Ecology

The biodiversity of the Texas Hill Country is threatened. With less than 1 percent of the land federally or municipally owned, preservation of the region's flora lies in the hands of private landowners. The fire ecology project scientifically examines the short and long-term effects of different land management methods and demonstrates these techniques to land owners and the general public.

The goal of this research program is to identify techniques that are effective in restoring and sustaining native plant communities of the Texas Hill Country. Our research compares and demonstrates short and long-term effects of some techniques based on historical ecological mechanisms such as summer wildfires and some techniques based on contemporary land management practices such as continuous grazing and winter prescribed burning. Visitors to the Wildflower Center can see this on-going research while walking the Restoration Research Trail.

Articles

Restoration Ecology (Volume 15 Issue 4, December 2007)
Mark T. Simmons
Selective and Non-Selective Control of Invasive Plants: The Short-Term Effects of Growing-Season Prescribed Fire, Herbicide, and Mowing in Two Texas Prairies
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