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Explore Plants

Welcome to Explore Plants. Our goal is to assemble and disseminate information that will encourage the sustainable use and conservation of native wildflowers, plants and landscapes throughout North America. The Native Plant Information Network (NPIN) is designed to inform a broad audience ranging from members of the general public such as homeowners, wildflower enthusiasts, and gardeners to practicing professionals such as botanists, land managers, and government personnel.

You can dig a little deeper into NPIN history with the links below or start your native plant journey with the Explore Plants menu to the right.

NPIN Resources | NPIN Updates | NPIN Personnel | Link to NPIN | Support NPIN

About the Native Plant Information Network (NPIN)

Now, more than ever, there is a need to bridge the gap between people and the natural world, a need to foster understanding and appreciation of the plant world, and a need to provide local, regional, and national audiences with scientifically accurate resources about their native plant heritage. Since its inception in 1982, the Wildflower Center has fulfilled those needs beginning with a mail-order Clearinghouse and continuing with its modern-day equivalent, the Native Plant Information Network (NPIN) - the Wildflower Center's national web portal for native plant information and resources.

Become a Contributor

The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is committed to developing a premier resource for native plant information in North America through continued growth of the Native Plant Information Network (NPIN). You can help us achieve our mission by contributing high-quality images and data to the Native Plant Information Network. Please contact Dr. Damon Waitt, Senior Botanist, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center to discuss how you can help this project grow.

Regional Spotlight: Southeast

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Native plant: Ilex vomitoria (Yaupon, Yaupon Holly, Cassina) Native from southern Virginia south to Florida and west to southeast Oklahoma and central Texas, Yaupon is a picturesque, upright, single- or multi-trunked shrub or small tree, growing 12-45 ft high but usually no higher than 25 ft. Female plants produce prodigious amounts of bright red, persistent berries. The leaves are dark green and small, usually less than 1 1/2 in. long. The pale gray bark is marked with white patches.
read more about this species or search for others

Mr. Smarty Plants: I have three different varieties of well established Baptisia that I have had for several years ... none of them bloom. One of my plants got a very small flower in April, but just pooped out after that. They are pretty plants, nice foliage ... but I love the blooms that I never get. They are in very loamy soil ... about six inches of decayed leaf litter with clay underneath. Any suggestions?
read the answer or search Mr. Smarty Plants

Supplier: Alexander Landscaping & Plant Farm (Davie, FL) Alexander Landscaping and Plant Farm collects and grows native south Florida woody's, wildflowers, trees, and palms.
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Organization: Fairchild Tropical Garden (Coral Gables (Miami), FL)
83 acre subtropical botanical garden with one of the world's best collection of palms, cycads and tropical flowering trees, shrubs and vines.
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Book: "Stalking the Wild Asparagus" (Putney: A.C. Hood and Company, Inc.) From Amazon.com Euell Gibbons was one of the few people in this country to devote a considerable part of his life to the adventure of "living off the land." His greatest pleasure was seeking out wild plants, which he made into delicious dishes. The plants he gathers and prepares in this book are widely available everywhere in North America. There are recipes for delicious vegetable and casserole dishes, breads, cakes, and twenty different pies. He also shows how to make numerous jellies, jams, teas, and wines, and how to sweeten them with wild honey or homemade maple syrup.
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