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Tuesday - February 20, 2007

From: Temple, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Rare or Endangered Plants
Title: Research on decline of Quercus hinckleyi
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I am doing a research project on the Hinckley's Oak (Quercus hinckleyi) and am in need of statistical data regarding the decline of this plant. I have been unable to find any data in this area. Any suggestions where to look? Thanks.

ANSWER:

In an extensive search in the biological bibliographic databases available at the University of Texas, I could find no articles dealing with Hinckley's oak (Quercus hinckleyi). In an internet search (that you may have done yourself) I found the present Texas County distributions from the USDA Plants Database and I found an article from the Center for Plant Conservation that had a list of references that might have some material that would be useful to you. The Flora of North America has some information on fossil evidence of ancient distributions of Q .hinckleyi and the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service has a Hinckley Oak Recovery Plan (Quercus hinckleyi) with a discussion of its distribution, abundance, conservation and research efforts.

If these sources don't have the data you are looking for, I suggest you contact the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Texas Forest Service and Texas Parks and Wildflfe Department to see if they have unpublished reports and/or data on the Hinckley Oak.

 

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