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Friday - November 08, 2013

From: Georgetown, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Propagation, Transplants, Herbs/Forbs, Wildflowers
Title: Transplanting bluebonnets in late Fall from Georgetown TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Transplanting bluebonnets in October? Neighbor wants to share abundance of rosettes and good size plants- any suggestions or warnings? Will freeze/frost protection be needed if we get December freezes again as last year? We're in Georgetown.

ANSWER:

From Aggie Horticulture, we found this article on bluebonnets which mentions transplanting rosettes of bluebonnets, with the following two paragraphs:


"To avoid possible problems with seed germination, many people will want to use transplants instead. Transplants, being older, tougher plants, are much easier to handle and establish. The transplant is also easier to space so that stand establishment in formal plantings is assured. Transplants as well as scarified seed of white, pink, and 'Worthington Blue' bluebonnets are available to accentuate and complement the beauty of the more common blue variety.

One way to ensure successful bluebonnet bloom from seed or transplants is to plant them in an ideal location. Ideal can be defined with one word, sunny. Bluebonnets will not perform well if grown in the shade or in an area which receives less than 8-10 hours of direct sunlight. If grown in a shaded area, the plant will be tall and spindly with few blooms."

We suggest you read our webpage on Lupinus texensis (Texas bluebonnet), especially noting the growing conditions and propagation instructions. Also read our How-To Article on How to Grow Bluebonnets.

 

From the Image Gallery


Texas bluebonnet
Lupinus texensis

Texas bluebonnet
Lupinus texensis

Texas bluebonnet
Lupinus texensis

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