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Mr. Smarty Plants - Evergreen plant to grow to 6 feet tall with flowers and non-toxic

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Monday - November 04, 2013

From: Corpus Christi, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Evergreen plant to grow to 6 feet tall with flowers and non-toxic
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I live in South Texas, and in town. I am looking for plant that grows taller than 6 feet and is non toxic to people and pets. Would also like for it to be pest and disease free or minimal. Need it to stay green year around, and would like for it to flower and/or produce fruit. Any suggestions?

ANSWER:

Here are some native trees of varying  heights (6 feet or more in height) that grow in South Texas and meet most of your criteria.

Cordia boissieri (Mexican olive) is evergreen, grows to 30 feet and has very showy flowers.  Here is more information from University of Arizona Pima County Cooperative Extension.

Ebenopsis ebano (Texas ebony) grows to 25-30 feet and is evergreen.   Here is more information from Arizona State University.

Persea borbonia (Redbay) can reach 65 feet, is evergreen and very aromatic.  Here is more information from Floridata.

Sophora secundiflora (Texas mountain laurel) usually grows 10 to 15 feet and has fragrant purple flowers in the Spring.  Here is more information from University of Arizona Pima County Cooperative Extension.  Unfortunately, the seeds are toxic.  Here is information from Poisonous Plants of North Carolina.

Guaiacum angustifolium (Texas lignum-vitae) is evergreen with beautiful purple flowers and is a good honeybee tree.   It grows 8 to 10 feet. Here is more information from Aggie Horticulture.

Ilex vomitoria (Yaupon) usually grows no more than 25 feet high, is evergreen and the female trees are filled with red berries that birds like to eat.  Here is more information from Aggie Horticulture.

Condalia hookeri (Bluewood condalia) is evergreen or semi-evergreen and grows to 30 feet.  Here's more information from Aggie Horticulture.

Leucophyllum frutescens (Cenizo) is evergreen and is covered with beautiful pink flowers several times a year after rains.  It can grow to 8 feet but usually stays around 5 feet or so.  Here is more information from Aggie Horitculture.

 

From the Image Gallery


Mexican olive
Cordia boissieri

Texas ebony
Ebenopsis ebano

Redbay
Persea borbonia

Texas mountain laurel
Sophora secundiflora

Texas lignum-vitae
Guaiacum angustifolium

Yaupon
Ilex vomitoria

Bluewood condalia
Condalia hookeri

Cenizo
Leucophyllum frutescens

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