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Mr. Smarty Plants - Propagating Pavonia seeds

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Thursday - October 10, 2013

From: Austin, TX
Region: Select Region
Topic: Propagation, Shrubs
Title: Propagating Pavonia seeds
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

Could you please recommend a method for scarifying Pavonia seeds? Thank you

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants took the liberty of editing your query into the form of a question.

You didn’t mention which Pavonia  you have seed for, but the native species in this area is Pavonia lasiopetala (Rock rose)

Clicking on the link above will bring up its NPIN page. Scrolling down the page will bring you to the following under Propagation.

Propagation
Propagation Material: Seeds , Softwood Cuttings
Description: Sow and lightly cover seed with soil. Pavonia can also be propagated from softwood tip cuttings. Take cuttings in spring before plant starts to bloom, or on nursery plants kept cut back. Cuttings with big buds or blooms are at a disadvantage. They root and grow fast in hot weather. Cut a stem three to six inches long, just below the node. Remove all but the top leaves and place in vermiculite.
Seed Collection: Seeds can be collected from the capsule when it turns brown, but before it becomes dry and splits. Spread in thin layers to thoroughly air-dry. Dust with Sevin dust and store in ventilated containers at room temperature. Will remain viable up to two years.
Seed Treatment: Germination may be staggered due to differences in seed coat thickness. More uniform germination rates may be achieved by first soaking the seeds in hot water.
Commercially Avail: yes
Maintenance: Cut back the shrub each year to encourage bushy growth. It may tend to become leggy during the growing season, so additional pruning may be necessary. Water intermittently to ensure blooming. Mildew is unavoidable - sometimes more sun seems to make it go away, sometimes not.

It seems that scarification is not required for this plant.

This link to Washington State University has some good information about seed germination .

 

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