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Saturday - September 28, 2013

From: Pflugerville, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Drought Tolerant, Trees
Title: Native Trees for Pflugerville TX
Answered by: Brigid & Larry Larson

QUESTION:

I'm looking for suggestions on native, drought tolerant conifers that can be located in a Pflugerville landscape under overhead electric lines. Open to Arizona Cypress, but concerned about the height. Not interested in perpetuating the allergies associated with Ashe Juniper? Just trying to find something a little different in a residential landscape and welcome any suggestions. Thanks!

ANSWER:

I have a few suggestions for you depending on which of all the characteristics you can weaken on first.  I searched the database for trees native to Texas that are evergreen and not-so-tall and have a decent number of suggestions!

If you really want conifers, that cuts the list right down!  As you mentioned, Hesperocyparis arizonica (Arizona cypress) showed up, but you might be as interested in the smaller Pinus cembroides (Mexican pinyon) or Pinus edulis (Colorado pinyon pine).  None of these are native to Williamson County, but instead grow farther out in West Texas.

 If you instead can tolerate simply an evergreen, then there are several possible selections.  Arbutus xalapensis (Texas madrone) and Diospyros texana (Texas persimmon) are fully native to Williamson County, are a decent height, and are interesting.  A bit farther out from Williamson County several interesting trees are native.  These include Ilex opaca (American holly), Ilex vomitoria (Yaupon), Leucaena retusa (Goldenball leadtree), and Sophora secundiflora (Texas mountain laurel).

Finally, I hear your reluctance towards Juniperus ashei (Ashe juniper).  I share that!  But, if you want to explore Cedars,  then there are several relatives native to Texas.  Juniperus virginiana (Eastern red cedar) is found closest to Williamson County. Juniperus deppeana (Alligator juniper) and Juniperus flaccida (Weeping juniper) are native a bit farther out.  In any case, these Junipers should not be as hard on the allergic!

 

From the Image Gallery


Colorado pinyon pine
Pinus edulis

Arizona cypress
Hesperocyparis arizonica

Mexican pinyon
Pinus cembroides

Texas madrone
Arbutus xalapensis

Texas persimmon
Diospyros texana

American holly
Ilex opaca

Eastern red cedar
Juniperus virginiana

Alligator juniper
Juniperus deppeana

Weeping juniper
Juniperus flaccida

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