Rent Shop Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
2 ratings

Saturday - August 31, 2013

From: Gainesville, FL
Region: Southeast
Topic: Grasses or Grass-like
Title: Carex texensis for Gainesville, Florida
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I am interested in planting Carex texensis in Gainesville Florida (zone 9). The site is part shade with little water. However, I do not see it listed as being used anywhere in Florida. Is it restricted from import? Our conditions are very similar to Houston.

ANSWER:

If you look at the USDA Plant Database distribution map for Carex texensis (Texas sedge), you will see that it is shown as occurring in Georgia, but not Florida.  However, Carex retroflexa (Reflexed sedge) does occur in Alachua County, Florida. Here is its Florida county distribution map.  Carex retroflexa var. texensis is a synonym for Carex texensis so the two species are obviously very closely related. Here is more information about its taxonomic history from Jepson Flora Project; and here is more information from San Marcos Growers in California and BloomingAdvantage.com in Oregon.  The Carex genus is, at best, problematic and since the two species (C. texensis and C. retroflexa) are closely related if not identical, I would say don't hesitate to use Carex texensis in Gainesville, Florida.  It is not invasive and certainly not restricted from import to Florida.

Good luck with it!

 

More Grasses or Grass-like Questions

Propagation of rain, oxblood, and copper lily bulbs
November 30, 2012 - I have Rain Lily, Oxblood Lily, and Copper Lily bulbs out of the ground, that are putting out some green growth. I would like to plant them soon. Is it okay to plant now and in December, or do I hav...
view the full question and answer

Types of Eragrostis lovegrasses that will survive in Northern Wisconsin
May 21, 2007 - I am interested in plains lovegrass, and know that it primarily grows in southern climates. Do you think it could thrive in northern Wisconsin if it is planted in a protected area? Could it survive ...
view the full question and answer

Groundcover for Laredo Texas
July 04, 2011 - I am in Laredo, TX and no longer want to waste water on grass. I would like to pull it all out and plant native, drought resistant ground cover - low growing, between 6-12 inches, sun and partial sha...
view the full question and answer

Groundcovers for Miami, FL
November 10, 2011 - I live in Miami, Florida. I have a medium size Bismarck Palm in my front yard. What would be a good ground cover other than grass around this palm?
view the full question and answer

Control methods for Cenchrus spinifex, Coastal sandbur
September 22, 2006 - I have some of the nicest, thickest, greenest grassburs in the county of Erath. What is the best and quickest way to get rid of them? I have heard of a product called cornmeal gluten. Any info appreci...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.