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A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Saturday - August 31, 2013

From: Gainesville, FL
Region: Southeast
Topic: Grasses or Grass-like
Title: Carex texensis for Gainesville, Florida
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I am interested in planting Carex texensis in Gainesville Florida (zone 9). The site is part shade with little water. However, I do not see it listed as being used anywhere in Florida. Is it restricted from import? Our conditions are very similar to Houston.

ANSWER:

If you look at the USDA Plant Database distribution map for Carex texensis (Texas sedge), you will see that it is shown as occurring in Georgia, but not Florida.  However, Carex retroflexa (Reflexed sedge) does occur in Alachua County, Florida. Here is its Florida county distribution map.  Carex retroflexa var. texensis is a synonym for Carex texensis so the two species are obviously very closely related. Here is more information about its taxonomic history from Jepson Flora Project; and here is more information from San Marcos Growers in California and BloomingAdvantage.com in Oregon.  The Carex genus is, at best, problematic and since the two species (C. texensis and C. retroflexa) are closely related if not identical, I would say don't hesitate to use Carex texensis in Gainesville, Florida.  It is not invasive and certainly not restricted from import to Florida.

Good luck with it!

 

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