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Monday - August 26, 2013

From: Dallas, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Grasses or Grass-like
Title: Ornamental grass next to golf course pond
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I need an ornamental grass or shrub that will grow on a terrace next to a golf course pond and be ~ 3' of height. The plant will receive afternoon sun, must survive periodic flooding in the spring and have low water needs.

ANSWER:

Here are three grasses that have the potential to do well on your terrace.   Please read the GROWING CONDITIONS area on each of the species page to see if they will match the sun/shade and moisture features of your site.

Andropogon glomeratus (Bushy bluestem) does best in full sun (more than 6 hours of sun per day).  It can handle flooding and on the edge of the pond will probably have enough moisture to do well.  Here is more information from Missouri Botanical Garden.

Chasmanthium latifolium (Inland sea oats) does best in shade (less than 2 hours of sun per day) and part shade (2 to 6 hours of sun per day).  It likes moisture but in shade or part shade should be fine.  Here is more information from Missouri Botanical Garden.

Sorghastrum nutans (Indiangrass) is a beautiful grass although, at maturity, is taller than you wanted.  It will tolerate saturated soil and will grow in sun, part shade and shade.  Here is more information from Missouri Botanical Garden.

 

From the Image Gallery


Bushy bluestem
Andropogon glomeratus

Bushy bluestem
Andropogon glomeratus

Inland sea oats
Chasmanthium latifolium

Inland sea oats
Chasmanthium latifolium

Indiangrass
Sorghastrum nutans

Indiangrass
Sorghastrum nutans

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