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Friday - August 23, 2013

From: Beaverton, OR
Region: Northwest
Topic: Groundcovers
Title: Groundcover for Oregon gravel path
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I'm looking for a native ground cover to grow in the gravel between flagstones in a path in my backyard. The gravel is 1/4-10 so it is very loose. The path gets midday sun but is shaded by the house in the morning and a big-leaf maple in the afternoon. The path is adjacent to beds with drip irrigation so it can be as dry or wet as I want. My first thought was creeping thyme, but I'd prefer something native.

ANSWER:

Here are a number of low-growing plants suitable for groundcovers.   They will all grow in part shade and are native to Washington County, Oregon or surrounding area.

Fragaria chiloensis (Beach strawberry)  Here is more information from University of California Marin Master Gardeners.

Fragaria virginiana (Virginia strawberry)  Here is more information from Seven Oaks Native Nursery in Albany OR.

Phlox adsurgens (Northern phlox)  Here is more information from Yerba Buena Nursery in Half Moon Bay CA.

Phyla nodiflora (Texas frogfruit)  Here is more information from Perennials.com.

Rhodiola integrifolia ssp. integrifolia (Ledge stonecrop)  Here is more information from Pacific Northwest Wildflowers.

Saxifraga bronchialis (Yellowdot saxifrage)  Here are photos and more information from Pacific Northwest Wildflowers.

Whipplea modesta (Common whipplea)  Here is more information from the Watershed Nursery.

 

From the Image Gallery


Beach strawberry
Fragaria chiloensis

Virginia strawberry
Fragaria virginiana

Northern phlox
Phlox adsurgens

Texas frogfruit
Phyla nodiflora

Ledge stonecrop
Rhodiola integrifolia ssp. integrifolia

Common whipplea
Whipplea modesta

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