En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
1 rating

Wednesday - January 31, 2007

From: Frederic, WI
Region: Southwest
Topic: Wildflowers
Title: Prime wildflower bloom viewing times in Texas
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I am planning to drive from Wisconsin to San Antonio in the spring. My schedule is flexible, so I would like to time the trip with the wildflower bloom. I grew up in Texas, but I can't remember when the wildflowers typically bloom. Can you help me narrow down the time frame? Can you also tell me if the conditions have been favorable for a good bloom this spring? Thanks.

ANSWER:

The Texas Hill Country has been experiencing drought conditions this fall, but the precipitation for January 2007 has been well above average. This is good news for the wildflowers. If we continue to receive normal or above normal rainfall, we should see a very good display of wildflowers this spring. Although bluebonnets and other wildflowers will usually begin blooming in early March and continue into May, the first weekend in April is usually when we can count on the peak of bluebonnet blooms. This may vary a bit, however, depending on temperatures and rainfall.

You can check on sightings and progress of blooming by visiting the following web sites:

1. Every spring the Wildflower Center devotes a portion of our website to wildflower sightings in the area. You can view this information, beginning around the middle of March, by browsing the Wildflower Center website and choosing the link from the "What's New" section.
2. Lonestar Internet, Inc. provides information on sightings and routes for viewing wildflowers.
3. You can find more routes and information at the Texas Hill Country Wildflower Trail web site.
4. DeWitt County offers its own wildflower site.
5. Brenham, Texas in Washington County also has a wildflower site. On the Brenham page, select "Visitor Information", then "Nature Watch" to find their information on wildflowers.

 

More Wildflowers Questions

Native flowers for a wedding in June in Tennessee
March 09, 2009 - I am planning a June 6th wedding on our farm. The wedding is in our backyard. I have lots of containers and several beds. Our daughter wants pink, purple, white and blue flowers. I have a greenhouse...
view the full question and answer

Preparation of seeds of Cosmos parviflorus for planting
July 21, 2014 - This is in regards to Cosmos Parviflorus. I reside directly outside of Big Bend National Park in Terlingua, TX. Cosmos Parviflorus grows naturally here and I have collected some seeds from a couple of...
view the full question and answer

Identity of maroon flower taking over bluebonnets
April 14, 2008 - there is a maroon colored flowering weed at my ranch in Oakwood Texas. It is taking over the bluebonnets and indian paint brushes. Can you tell me what it is and how to get rid of it.
view the full question and answer

Starting Antelope Horn Milkweed Seeds
March 08, 2013 - I recently found a sealed plastic bag containing milkweed seeds in a cabinet drawer that I had gathered more than a year ago, (maybe two years ago). These are the "antelope horn" milkweed I think it...
view the full question and answer

What do wildflower seeds look like from Westlake Village CA
February 23, 2014 - I collect seeds from my wild flower garden but can't always tell what part of the dried flower is the actual seed that will reproduce. Is there a resource that shows the seed part of flowers? Than...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2015 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center