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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

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Saturday - July 20, 2013

From: Burnet, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Invasive Plants, Problem Plants
Title: Controlling Triadica sebifera (Chinese tallow tree)
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

We are trying to remove Chinese tallow trees from the lake bed on Lake Buchanan. We cut them down, but they grow back from the roots. They are very hard to dig out. Do you have any suggestions for how we can destroy the roots? Thanks!

ANSWER:

Please visit the Texas Invasives Database and read their suggestions about applying herbicides to control Triadica sebifera (Chinese tallow tree).  Here is more information about the tree from Global Invasive Species Database and their article, Management Information on Triadica sebifera.  And here is more information from the Invasive Plant Atlas of the MidSouth.

If you choose to use herbicides, be sure to read the container label and observe precautions to protect your safety and that of the environment.

 

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