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Wednesday - June 05, 2013

From: Los Angeles, CA
Region: California
Topic: Erosion Control
Title: Erosion control for steep slope in Southern California
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I need help for soil erosion control for a steep slope in sunny Southern California. Thank you.

ANSWER:

Las Pilitas Nursery in Escondido and Santa Margarita has an article, Erosion Control for Hillside or Garden Slope, with excellent recommendations for assessing and stabilizing your slope geared for Southern California sites.  They also have recommendations for plants for various slope conditions.  Since I don't know your situation precisely I can only give a few general plant recommendations but you can find more on the Las Pilitas site.

California Salvias are drought tolerant and beautiful when they bloom.  Here are a few that do well in Los Angeles County:

Salvia apiana (White sage)

Salvia clevelandii (Fragrant sage)

Salvia columbariae (California sage)

Salvia leucophylla (San luis purple sage)

Read more about these sages and others on the Las Pilitas Nursery California Native Sages page.

Artemisia californica (Coastal sagebrush) is very useful in erosion control and is evergreen.

Verbena lasiostachys (Western vervain) is another very useful erosion control plant.  Here is more information from Las Pilitas Nursery.

Eriogonum cinereum (Coastal buckwheat) and other Eriogonum species make good erosion control plants.

Adenostoma fasciculatum (Chamise) is another evergreen shrub that is an excellent erosion control plant.  Here are photos and more information from Las Pilitas Nursery.

 

From the Image Gallery


White sage
Salvia apiana

Fragrant sage
Salvia clevelandii

California sage
Salvia columbariae

San luis purple sage
Salvia leucophylla

Coastal sagebrush
Artemisia californica

Western vervain
Verbena lasiostachys

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