En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Tuesday - May 21, 2013

From: Waterford, CA
Region: California
Topic: Poisonous Plants
Title: Beneficial characteristics of Phytolacca americana (Pokeweed)
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I have a surprise Polk weed plant growing in my back yard, does it have any beneficial uses,and if not, how best to eradicate it. Thank you.

ANSWER:

Phytolacca americana (American pokeweed) is a very interesting plant and about this time each year we get inquiries from people about this large plant with white flowers and/or purple berries growing on their property. Native Americans used various parts of the plant to treat numerous ailments.  Although the plants are considered poisonous, their various parts (leaves, shoots, berries) are also edible if collected and prepared properly.  Here is more information from Ohio State University Extension.

There are several plants growing in my yard here in Texas.   I like them!   The birds love the berries; but, given the toxic nature of the plant—especially if you have children that come into your yard and would be attracted to the red berries—you might want to remove your plant.  They aren't an endangered species.  You want to do this before the plant is well-established.  Since you have only one plant, it shouldn't be too difficult to achieve.  If possible, dig up the entire plant with as much of the root as possible.  If you can't get the entire root out of the ground, you could paint the cut surface of the root with an herbicide (such as RoundUp) using a small foam brush.  You will want to paint the cut surface quickly after you cut down the plant because most plant cells can quickly seal themselves (a defense mechanism) and, thus, won't absorb as much herbicide.  Seal the plant in a plastic bag and dispose of it in the garbage.  Read and follow the health safety directions on the herbicide container and be careful not to get the herbicide on any plant you're interested in keeping.  More plants may show up.  Birds eat and deposit seeds.

Here's an interesting article:  Pokeweed, American (Phytolacca americana):  The Jekyll and Hyde Plant.

 

From the Image Gallery


American pokeweed
Phytolacca americana

American pokeweed
Phytolacca americana

American pokeweed
Phytolacca americana

American pokeweed
Phytolacca americana

American pokeweed
Phytolacca americana

More Poisonous Plants Questions

Plant-related skin rashes from Round Rock TX
September 23, 2013 - I have been plagued with persistent skin rashes this summer, and it is happening with plants that have never bothered me before, for example, red yucca. The dermatologist says it is a plant reaction,...
view the full question and answer

Cutting back non-native oleanders affected by freeze in Austin
January 30, 2010 - After the last hard freeze makes my oleanders look dead. Can I cut them down to the ground this time of year?
view the full question and answer

Grasses for horses in Austin
October 27, 2012 - Hello Mr. Smarty Plants We just bought 4.5 acres in Travis County off HWY 290. We have 3 horses we keep on it but there is very little grass in the pastures. What is the best type of grass to seed ...
view the full question and answer

Are black walnut and sugar maple poisonous to alpacas
June 09, 2008 - I have alpacas and wonder if black walnut or sugar maple are poisonous to them.
view the full question and answer

Natural fibers for lashing bamboo in weaving
May 07, 2008 - I live in Austin and am looking for plants I can use for weaving fibers, e.g. lashing bamboo for a small project. What plants and parts do you recommend? What resources do you recommend for informatio...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center