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Tuesday - May 14, 2013

From: San Antonio, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Invasive Plants, Trees
Title: What is meant when Mimosa Tree is described as an invasive tree in San Antonio TX?
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

When it is stated that the Mimosa Tree is invasive, does that mean that the Roots are invasive or does it mean that the seed pods will drop and make many more trees ?

ANSWER:

There are eleven species of Mimosa in our Native Plants Database, but for the most part, they are shrubs or sub shrubs. Mimosa Tree refers to Albizia julibrissin which is a widely used ornamental tree that was introduced into the US from Asia in 1745.  Also known as silk tree or silky acacia, it is a small to medium-sized tree that can grow up to 20-40 feet tall.

The tree has its proponents as well as detractors. Check out davesgarden.com (scroll down to comments),  and gardenweb.com.


It has also made the Texas Invasives list. Scroll down the page to find recommendations for alternative plants.





 

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