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Sunday - May 05, 2013

From: Albuquerque, NM
Region: Southwest
Topic: Non-Natives, Herbs/Forbs
Title: Growing non-native daylilies from Albuquerque
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Need some tips on planting daylilies in the Northeast heights of Albuquerque. I've amended clay soil with cottonbur mulch/compost mix and added gypsum. Can I do anything else to ensure growing success?

ANSWER:

From a previous Mr. Smarty Plants answer:

The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, home of Mr. Smarty Plants, is committed to the growth, protection and propagation of plants native not only to North America but to the area in which those plants grow naturally; in your case, Bernalillo County, NM. Daylilies, once erroneously placed in the Liliaceae family of plants, now are considered to be in the Hemerocallis family. They are native to Eurasia - China, Japan and Korea - and are therefore out of our line of expertise. From the Univesity of Minnesota Extension Service, here is an article on Growing Daylilies. We understand there are many thousands of cultivars and selections of this plant, perennials which bloom one day, in the nursery trade, but beyond that, we know nothing about them.

 

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