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Friday - November 10, 2006

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Wildflowers
Title: Wildflowers for wedding mid-spring in Austin, TX
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

My fiancé and I are both native Texans, and we are looking to have a beautiful yet simple wedding on March 31, 2007. We would love to use TX wildflowers. Our colors are white, orange, and blue. Would you make some suggestions for flowers in those colors that would be in bloom that time of year? Flowers that we could use as cut flowers in bridal party bouquets? Thanks so much!

ANSWER:

Bluebonnets (Lupinus texsensis) can begin blooming as early as February and reach their peak usually around the first weekend in April for the Austin area. They should be in abundance (given plenty of rain) at the time of your wedding. Other "blue" flower possibilities at the end of March are Bushy skullcap (Scutellaria wrightii) and Blue-eyed grass (Sisyrinchium angustifolium).

Texas paintbrush (Castilleja indivisa) is your best bet for an orange flower the end of March.

Blackfoot daisies (Melampodium leucanthum) have handsome white flowers that bloom March through November. Another choice for a white flower is one of the lazy daisies; for example, Arkansas lazy daisy (Aphanostephus skirrhobasis).

 

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