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Monday - March 18, 2013

From: Hemphill, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Plant Identification
Title: Identification of tiny blue flower blooming in February
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

There is a very small four petal flower that appears near the end of Winter. (This year they appeared in late Feb). These little flowers are a "Light Blueish" hue. They are around a quarter inch across and are only an inch or so tall. We used to call them "Daiseys". Can you identify these little flowers?

ANSWER:

I believe your little blue "daisy" is Houstonia pusilla (Tiny bluet).  It is one of the first plants to bloom at the end of winter.

Here are more photos from the University of Texas School of Biological Sciences' Archive of Central Texas Plants, Southwest Environmental Information Network and from Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia.

 

From the Image Gallery


Tiny bluet
Houstonia pusilla

Tiny bluet
Houstonia pusilla

Tiny bluet
Houstonia pusilla

Tiny bluet
Houstonia pusilla

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