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Wednesday - October 18, 2006

From: Lago Vista, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Herbs/Forbs
Title: Technique of using cut flowers to make paper
Answered by: Joe Marcus

QUESTION:

Have an inquiry regarding how to locate (or if such a craft/technique exists) someone or some service that is aware of a process to take fresh-cut flowers & dry & press them into paper or onto paper that can then be written on. Do any of you know of any arts & crafts person or service here in Austin/Hill Country area associated with your Wildflower Center that performs this sort of craft/process? Thanks & regards.

ANSWER:

There are various techniques for making paper. Which technique you use will depend largely on what kind of finished product you want. Fortunately, there is a wealth of information on the Internet about making paper from many different resources and which incorporate many different constituents - including wildflowers. A quick inquiry on your favorite search engine using key words like, "paper making," how to make paper," or even " wildflower paper making" will produce numerous ideas and techniques for you to try.

You might also inquire with The Art School of the Austin Museum of Art for local papermaking artists and teachers.

 

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