Rent Shop Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
1 rating

Wednesday - January 23, 2013

From: Santa Fe, NM
Region: Southwest
Topic: Non-Natives, Edible Plants, Trees
Title: Sweet cherry tree for New Mexico
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

What is the best kind of sweet cherry tree to plant in Santa Fe, NM? I have apple, apricot, peach and pear. Would like cherry unless it is a bad idea.

ANSWER:

The only cherries native to New Mexico are Prunus emarginata (Bitter cherry), Prunus serotina (Black cherry) and Prunus virginiana (Chokecherry) and, although, they are food for wildlife and are used for making jelly and wine, they are NOT really sweet enough to eat as fruit.  What you are looking for is one of the cultivars of Prunus avium (Sweet cherry), a native of Europe, Asia and the Middle East.  Our focus and expertise are with plants native to North America so we really aren't in a position to advise you. Your best bet for help is the New Mexico State University Extension Service.  You can find contact information near home on the Santa Fe County Extension Office site.  The Santa Fe Master Gardener Program might also  have some suggestions for you.

 

More Edible Plants Questions

Problems with chile pequin from Pflugerville TX
July 19, 2012 - Hello there! I have a question about my chile pequin (Capsicum annuum L.) plant. I purchased it last year from the Wildflower Center Fall Plant Sale. It stayed in a pot until three months ago when I p...
view the full question and answer

Native Grasses as a Hay Crop in Beeville, TX
October 22, 2014 - I am looking to cut Hay on about 38 acres just west of Beeville, Texas. I want to convert the land to native grasses, but I still want to have a decent hay crop that I can sell. What is a good set of ...
view the full question and answer

Use of cenizo (Leucophyllum frutescens) for tea
February 20, 2006 - Back in the 50's when I spent the summers with my grandmother south of Hondo, Texas, she use to pick leaves from the cenizo (purple sage) bushes, dry them and then brew them for tea. I asked one of m...
view the full question and answer

Edible native plants for Camp Wood, TX
November 01, 2012 - We live northwest of Camp Wood, TX in the uplands, so our soil is shallow with caliche and limestone beneath and is clay-like with the typical higher pH. Are there any native trees, bushes, vines, or...
view the full question and answer

Rust on Blackberry
April 17, 2015 - I have two new blackberry bushes that I planted fall 2014. Only weeks after I planted the plant began to have rust color balls under the leaves then leaves began to die and fall off. When I returned t...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.