Explore Plants

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 

Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Thursday - January 03, 2013

From: Long Beach, NY
Region: Northeast
Topic: General Botany
Title: Seaweed seed dispensers in Long Island, NY
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

Several months ago, we found what are probably seaweed seed dispensers. They are dark brown, hard, four sharp points,section where it would have connected to the main plant and an open hole where the seeds could have been dispersed. Only found three during the summer. My grandchildren and I appreciate your help. Sincerely,

ANSWER:

Only the plants belonging to the groups Gymnosperms and Angiosperms have seed dispensers (think of pine cones and apples). The seaweeds (kelps and rock weeds) have a very different means of reproduction that doesn’t involve the production of seeds.

What you have found most likely are the egg cases of a shark or skate, which are often called  “mermaid’s purses”. This link describes egg cases in some detail and includes images to compare with what you have found. To help further your grandchildren’s interest in sharks and marine life, check out the Shark Research Institute, which is located in Princeton, NJ, and select “Kids” from the menu.

 

More General Botany Questions

Smarty Plants on aceae
March 21, 2005 - How is the family suffix "-aceae", as in Asteraceae, pronounced? I find disagreeing claims in my searches- "ay-see-ee" and "ay-see-ay" seem to be the most common, but I've also seen just "ay-...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants on spines
April 09, 2005 - What do you call part of a plant that is needle-like or has spikes or bristles?
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants on cell elongation
June 09, 2005 - Why do plants grow faster in the dark?
view the full question and answer

Liquid glucose as substitute for sunlight from New York City
December 16, 2012 - I am curious to find out whether liquid glucose can be poured as water for mung bean plants as substitute for no sunlight. Is the possible? Will a specific amount of glucose need to be used? Can liqui...
view the full question and answer

Fasciation on Texas Mountain Laurel
November 21, 2012 - Do Texas Mountain Laurel normally have a staghorn looking growth hanging on them after blooming in addition to the seed pod clusters or could this be a mutation?
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.