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Sunday - December 16, 2012

From: New York City, NY
Region: Northeast
Topic: General Botany, Non-Natives
Title: Liquid glucose as substitute for sunlight from New York City
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I am curious to find out whether liquid glucose can be poured as water for mung bean plants as substitute for no sunlight. Is the possible? Will a specific amount of glucose need to be used? Can liquid glucose be made by boiling water and sugar together?

ANSWER:

Last question first, nope, to make liquid glucose, you have to start with glucose powder. Here is an article from Seasoned Advice with several recipes for making liquid glucose.

eHow How to Grow Large Mung Bean Sprouts, in which is this phrase: "Allow the jars to sit in the sun for four hours daily, moving them into a warm, dark place for the rest of the day."

And that is about as far as we can help you. , Vigna radiata, Mung Beans, are native to the Indian subcontinent. The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, home of Mr. Smarty Plants, is dedicated to the growth, propagation and protection of plants native to North America.


 

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