En EspaŅol
Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Mr. Smarty Plants - Non-native Chamaecyparis pisiflora turning brown in Fuqua-Varina NC

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Monday - December 10, 2012

From: Fuquay-Varina, NC
Region: Southeast
Topic: Non-Natives, Diseases and Disorders, Pests, Trees
Title: Non-native Chamaecyparis pisiflora turning brown in Fuqua-Varina NC
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I have a "Soft Serve False Cypress" Chamaecyparis pisifera'Dow Whiting PPAF, that has only been in the ground for 6-7 months. I just noticed that the branches and leaves are starting to die, turning brown from the inside toward the outside. What could be the problem and how can I fix it.

ANSWER:

From Garden Adventures Nursery, here is an article on how this plant was developed for commercial use. Apparently the development of this plant began with a mutation on Chamaecyparis pisiflora 'Boulevard'.  We believe the 'Boulevard' is a trade name for Chamaecyparis pisiflora, which is native to Japan. When you have followed the trail of how this plant was developed, you will understand why there are so many factors involved, making it difficult to isolate a problem. Since the original plant is not native to North America, it falls out of our expertise at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, where we specialize in the growth, propagation and protection of plants native not only to North America but to the areas in which the plants grow naturally.

In our Native Plant Database, there are two members of the genus Chamaecyparis, from which we might find some clues:

Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (Port orford cedar) - Native only to northern California and Oregon. 

Chamaecyparis thyoides (Atlantic white cedar) - This species thrives in a cool, moist atmosphere where it is protected from drying winds. It is relatively free of serious disease or insect problems and not susceptible to apple-cedar rust. It does not compete with hardwood species. It is native to North Carolina.

We did a little investigating into the climate of Wake County, in central North Carolina, and discovered it is humid and therefore could be considered acceptable to your plant. One possibility that occurs to us is transplant shock, which can show up in a transplanted plant for up to 3 years after it has been planted. Trimming of dead branches and checking for damage to the trunk are usually recommended.

We found a website, University of California Integrated Pest Management, on Pests and Diseases of Chamaecyparis. From eHow, here is an article on Chamaecyparis Diseases.

 

More Diseases and Disorders Questions

Leaves on yaupon holly turning brown/black
July 20, 2011 - Arlington TX Yaupon Holly has leaves on stems closer to the bottom of the plant and moving up that are turning brown/black. Is this a disease, over/under watering? There is black gummy soil, but it ha...
view the full question and answer

Problems with non-native Banana Shrub from Houston
May 01, 2014 - My 7' beloved Banana Shrub (magnolia) has white dots on top of the leaves and nasty black stuff covering the backside of the leaves. The plant is dropping leaves. What can I do to save it? I has bee...
view the full question and answer

What about the brown dots on my Silver sage?
June 27, 2008 - During the past year, the leaves on my silver sage bushes around the perimeter of the front of my house have turned yellow in places and there are tiny brown dots on virtually all of the leaves. If I ...
view the full question and answer

Problems with dogwood tree in Jacksonville FL
February 28, 2010 - Sir, I believe I have a Cornus drummondii, a stiff dogwood tree on my lawn which a few years ago was big, lush and full of branches and leaves. In the last 2 years I have noticed about 80% of it drop...
view the full question and answer

Time for trimming oaks from Boerne TX
July 03, 2012 - I want to trim a native red oak but am scared to touch it because I dont want to lose it. It is the primary source of shade in our back yard. Also I want to trim the live oaks and am surrounded with O...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center