En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Monday - November 12, 2012

From: Collierville, TN
Region: Southeast
Topic: Container Gardens, Herbs/Forbs
Title: Planting horsetail indoors from Collierville TN
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I would like to plant horsetail indoors. Can it handle the inside? Will it try to go dormant or it that a temperature trigger which means it will not go dormant?

ANSWER:

This is the second time this week we have been asked a question we had not heard before. We get a lot of questions about members of the Equisetum (horsetail) family, but so far they have all involved being used in ponds or wetlands gardens, outdoors. We suggest that you first read our How-To Article on Container Gardening with Native Plants.

There are 3 species of the Equisetum genus native to Tennessee:

Equisetum arvense (Field horsetail) - high water use, sun, part shade or shade

Equisetum hyemale (Canuela) - medium water use, sun, part shade or shade

Equisetum hyemale var. affine (Scouringrush horsetail) - medium water use, sun or part shade

You can follow each plant link to our webpage on that plant, which pretty well tells you all we know about that plant, including sunlight needed, soil moisture, etc. None of them mentioned being grown indoors, but all mentioned that it is best to contain it in a pot with no holes and be watchful that it doesn't creep over the edge. It is very aggressive.

So, we went hunting on the Internet. The first thing we found was this Garden Web Forum on How to Grow Horsetail Indoors.  From e-How.com, here is an article on Horsetail Rush Plants, which does mention growing them in a sunny window or under a bright plant light.

Basically, because we have no personal experience or information on it in our Native Plant Database, you will be experimenting. The plants are all attractive and almost architectural in nature, so we assume it would be worth a try. 

 

From the Image Gallery


Field horsetail
Equisetum arvense

Canuela
Equisetum hyemale

Scouringrush horsetail
Equisetum hyemale var. affine

More Herbs/Forbs Questions

Correction of tree name from Bay Point CA
October 16, 2013 - The tree should of been Mulberry don't know how it was changed!! Tuesday - October 15, 2013 From: Bay Point, CA Region: California Topic: Non-Natives, Cacti and Succulents, Trees Title: Non-...
view the full question and answer

Tall perennials for a sunny North Carolina border
March 26, 2012 - I need border plants for in front of a picket fence along front sidewalk. Space is only approx 1'6" wide and widening is not an option. So far I have daylilies, cannas, Mexican petunias, daisies, i...
view the full question and answer

Low Ground Cover for Steep, Shaded PA Site
February 17, 2014 - I am located in Downingtown, PA, right on the border between Zone 6 and 7. Please provide a recommendation of a native ground cover for the following conditions: steep slope (greater than 45%), full s...
view the full question and answer

Stabilizing a lakeside slope from Bracey, VA
May 24, 2012 - We are trying to beautify and stabilize a relatively large lakeside steep slope with a southern exposure in central Virginia. The soil is characterized by red clay and shale rock. How can we turn this...
view the full question and answer

Euphorbia 'Cherokee' leaves drying from Benson AZ
October 24, 2012 - I have a Euphorbia 'Cherokee' in a pot and has been growing nicely but some of the leaves are turning red and drying up and falling off. Is this normal for this plant?
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center