En Español

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Monday - October 22, 2012

From: Tickfaw, LA
Region: Southeast
Topic: Plant Identification, Trees
Title: Identification of a tree at David Crockett Cabin Museum in Tennessee
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I was in Lawrenceburg TN and stopped by the David Crockett Cabin Museum. There was a tree and it dropped lemon sized balls on the ground. What kind of tree is it?

ANSWER:

Here are a list of several native trees that occur in or near Lawrence County, Tennesssee that are a possibility:

Aesculus flava (Sweet buckeye)  Here are more photos and information with photos of the fruit (nut) from Duke University and North Carolina State University.

Aesculus glabra (Ohio buckeye)  Here are more photos and information from North Carolina State University and Missouri Plants.

Aesculus pavia (Scarlet buckeye)  Here are more photos and information from Missouri Botanical Garden and Duke University.

Aesculus sylvatica (Painted buckeye)  Here are more photos and information from Duke University and Southeastern Flora.

Asimina triloba (Pawpaw)  Here are more photos and information from Duke University and Missouri Botanical Garden.

Diospyros virginiana (Common persimmon)  Here are more photos and information from Duke University and Missouri Botanical Garden.

Maclura pomifera (Osage orange)  Here are more photos and information from Duke University and Missouri Botanical Garden.

If you don't see the fruit that you describe, you can go to our Native Plant Database and do a search yourself.  Choose COMBINATION SEARCH and select "Tennessee" from Select State or Province and "Tree" from Habit (general appearance) to find a list of trees native to Tennessee with links to their species page with photos.

 

From the Image Gallery


Ohio buckeye
Aesculus glabra

Scarlet buckeye
Aesculus pavia

Common persimmon
Diospyros virginiana

Osage orange
Maclura pomifera

More Trees Questions

Shumard oak or live oak in Waco TX?
October 02, 2009 - Dear Mr Smarty Plants, I planted 2 small Shumard oaks in my front yard (east side of the house, 8-9 hours of sun per day) 18 months ago. Both had been purchased from a national chain store's garden ...
view the full question and answer

Grafting stone fruit
April 02, 2009 - Do you know of anyone grafting the new low chill stone fruit trees to the Mexican plum to minimize cotton rot? Or would it even work?
view the full question and answer

Plants beneath native bald cypress trees in Thibodaux LA
September 14, 2009 - I have a bed that needs to be revamped and it has two beautiful 18 year old Bald cypress trees. I would like to work the soil and plant some appropriate shade tolerant plants. How do I work the soil...
view the full question and answer

Wild plum tree failing to bloom from Simonton TX
May 04, 2013 - I have a wild plum tree that has been in the ground for 3 or 4 years and it has not ever flowered. Why? I don't know what kind it is. I dug it up from a friends yard. Her wild plum trees have flowere...
view the full question and answer

Dwarf golden cypress outgrowing their space
December 28, 2008 - I planted two dwarf golden cypress on opposite sides of a dwarf alberta spruce in a small bed by the front door. After 4 years I have to severely prune back the dwarf cypress in spring as they will sp...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | JOBS | SITEMAP | STAFF INTRANET
© 2016 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center