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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

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Friday - October 12, 2012

From: Mesquite, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Invasive Plants, Non-Natives, Herbs/Forbs
Title: Hydrilla problems in Tom Bean Lake in Mesquite, TX.
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

What is the lifespan of Hydrilla in 30 acre lake at Tom Bean Tx? Does it grow spring thru summer and then hibernate thru winter ??

ANSWER:

Could be forever.

Hydrilla verticillata has been called the most problematic aquatic plant in the United States. This plant, native to Africa, Australia, and parts of Asia, was introduced to Florida in 1960 via the aquarium trade. It is a perennial plant that grows during the spring and summer, and becomes dormant in the fall and winter. In the spring, it regenerates itself by means of stolons, rhizomes, turions,  and tubers, and could well cover a 30 acre lake.

I’m going to provide you with several links that explains its growth  and tells how it may be controlled.

State of Washington

University of Texas

University of North Carolina
 
Exotic Aquatics on the Move  

 

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