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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Monday - September 10, 2012

From: Washington, DC
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Non-Natives, Transplants, Trees
Title: Problems with new transplant non-native weeping willow from Washington DC
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I replanted a very young BABY weeping willow tree and now it looks as if the leaves are drying up like it is dying. I know that it could also be in shock from the new transplant or it can be dying My question is should I cut off the dying leaves and dying branches and wait for new ones to grow?

ANSWER:

This is not a new subject for us. Please read this previous question on transplanting a young willow. This previous question covers most of your question. We would recommend neither planting nor pruning a woody plant, native or not, until November, and see how it is doing then.

 

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