En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Thursday - August 30, 2012

From: Dennisport, MA
Region: Northeast
Topic: Planting, Shrubs, Trees
Title: Need suggestions for a small tree for cemetery in NH.
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

I would like suggestions for picking a SMALL tree for a rural cemetery in Winchester, NEW HAMPSHIRE. Would the delicate Japanese Elm be suitable for the weather, etc?

ANSWER:

You may have done this already, but Mr. Smarty Plants suggests that you get in touch with the people who manage and maintain the cemetery to see if they have  a list of recommended plants to use as well as a list of plants you cannot use in the cemetery. One thing you can do is look around the cemetery and see what plantings are present; there may be some good examples as well as bad examples. This page makes a statement about what can happen to plants in cemeteries.

The mission of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is to increase the sustainable use and conservation of native wildflowers, plants and landscapes; so the Japanese Elm would not get our vote. As the name implies, it is native to Japan. Also, with a crown height of 35 - 55’ and a crown width of 25 - 35’, it would be considered a medium to large tree.

To find some plants, lets go to our Native Plant Database to see if we can find a tree to fit the bill. Using the Combination Search box, select New Hampshire under State, tree under Habit, and perennial under Duration. Check sun under Light requirement and dry under Soil moisture. Click on the Submit Combination Search button, and you will get a  list of 43 trees for New Hampshire landscapes. Clicking  on the scientific name of each plant will bring up its NPIN page which contains a description of the plant, its growth characteristics and requirements, and in most cases images. As you check out each plant, you can note its size and  and other features. If you repeat the search and select shrub instead of tree under Habit, you will get a list of 37 shrubs/trees for your consideration

Here is a short list of plants that could be possibilities. The first two are from the tree list, and the last two are from the shrub list.

Prunus serotina (Black cherry)  image

Prunus virginiana (Chokecherry)  image

Rhus glabra (Smooth sumac)

Amelanchier arborea (Common serviceberry)  image

As you plan, keep in mind that the plants will need some care as they grow.

You may find this article about cemetery horticulture interesting.



 

From the Image Gallery


Smooth sumac
Rhus glabra

Smooth sumac
Rhus glabra

More Trees Questions

Non-native Norfolk Pine suffering in Corpus Christi TX
August 02, 2011 - About ten yrs. ago I transplanted my Norfolk Pine into the ground in my backyard. With all the frosty weather of 2010/2011 the Spring brought a browning/dying of a lot of the Norfolk Pines in this are...
view the full question and answer

About Live Oak trees in Austin, Texas
October 19, 2009 - Hello, I planted a couple texas live oak two years ago in South Austin. They're about 5 feet tall. How long will it take for them to mature? Thanks
view the full question and answer

Distinguishing elm species from volunteers in yard
April 10, 2008 - What's the best way to distinguish young elm tree species apart from one another? We have a bunch coming up in our yard and we're trying to figure out if they are Winged, Cedar or American. Some of ...
view the full question and answer

Small tree for Huntingdon Beach, CA
November 09, 2008 - I have the exact same question as a previous tree question from Huntington Beach California. When I click on the answer it brings up another question. I would like to know the answer given for the 10 ...
view the full question and answer

Problem with Live Oaks in Mesa AZ
March 26, 2013 - I have two Evergreen Live Oaks in central Arizona. One is flourishing and getting new spring leaves from top to bottom. Its trunk is rough, has large grooves, and the spots where I've pruned look li...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2015 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center