En Español

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Saturday - August 18, 2012

From: Pleasanton, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Rare or Endangered Plants, Seasonal Tasks, Watering, Trees
Title: Sycamore leaf snowbell from Pleasanton TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

How do you care for a sycamore leaf snowbell. Does it like sun or part shade? How much water? How often and what should it be fed. How fast or slowly does it grow? Anything you can tell me would be appreciated

ANSWER:

Begin by going to our webpage on Styrax platanifolius (Sycamoreleaf snowbell). Here are the Growing Conditions for that plant:

"Growing Conditions

Water Use: Medium
Light Requirement: Part Shade
Soil Moisture: Moist
Drought Tolerance: Medium
Soil Description: Rich soils along Edwards Plateau streams on limestone rock."

Although we were unable to establish if this tree grows natively in Atacosa County, it looks like the conditions there would fit the above conditions.

From Texas Parks and Wildlife, here is an article on Texas Snowbells. Please note that it is an endangered plant, so it should not be removed from the wild.

From the Texas A&M Native Plant Database, Sycamore-leaf Snowbell.

Hopefully, the information from these articles will give you the desired information.

 

From the Image Gallery


Sycamore-leaf snowbell
Styrax platanifolius

Sycamore-leaf snowbell
Styrax platanifolius

Sycamore-leaf snowbell
Styrax platanifolius

More Trees Questions

Leaves dropping from a potted Mesquite
August 11, 2014 - I have a Prosopis pubescens (Screwbean Mesquite) that I purchased at a nursery in Alpine, TX just a few miles away from me. It was a in nursery style black plastic container. The mesquite is perhaps a...
view the full question and answer

Identification of oak trees in Pennsylvania
October 14, 2013 - I am an avid hunter in PA. I found these nuts and was wondering what kind they are. There is a red oak beside this tree, and I know what a white oak is but this tree and it's nuts look to be from a...
view the full question and answer

Protection of Mountain Laurel from Pyralid or Genista moth caterpillars
May 28, 2006 - I have a Texas Mountain Laurel. Every year it is attacked by caterpillars. They form a bag for lack of a better word on the ends of the branches destroying the blooms for the following year. PLEASE...
view the full question and answer

Trees to replace ones lost in Westchester County, NY
May 09, 2013 - We lost a large number of trees in the forest adjacent to our home, and I plan to replant them. What species do you recommend to plant the area with natives and to keep it looking "natural."
view the full question and answer

How do you determine male persimmon seedlings from the females?
May 11, 2013 - I have got new persimmon seedlings about 3 inches tall this spring, and am wondering if there is any way to tell male from female at this young stage? I just don't want to plant 20 or 40 seedlings an...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | JOBS | SITEMAP | STAFF INTRANET
© 2016 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center