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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

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Sunday - September 03, 2006

From: Volente, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Drought Tolerant
Title: Help with native plants suffering from drought and heat
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Dear Mr. Smarty Plants, HELP!!! I live on Lake Travis outside Austin and we planted our yard this spring with lots of wonderful native plants. Now most of them look like they are dying (in particular the sea oats, salvia, stemodia, silk tassle, and black foot daisies). Is there anyone in this area who we could hire to come visit our house and advise us on why we are losing our plants? Thank you!

ANSWER:

I suspect your plant problems have a lot to do with the current drought and high temperatures we have been experiencing recently. You can find Landscape Professionals who specialize in native plants in your area who should be able to determine the cause and the solution to your problem by visiting our National Suppliers Directory.

 

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