En EspaŅol
Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Mr. Smarty Plants - Difference between class notes and size notes on website

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Thursday - August 09, 2012

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: General Botany
Title: Difference between class notes and size notes on website
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I enjoy using the native plant database in planning my flower beds. However, I don't know the difference between Class notes and size notes. Can you help me out?

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants is very happy that you find our Native Plant Database useful in your planning.  I think you are asking about the difference between Size Notes and Size Class found under PLANT CHARACTERISTICS on the species page for the different plants in our Native Plant Database.  Size Class  is a way to categorize the plants into size groups.   One way this data can be used is to search for plants of a particular size in our Native Plant Database using the COMBINATION SEARCH option.   For instance, if you were looking for shrubs in Texas no taller than 5 feet, you would enter "Texas" under Select State or Province, "Shrub" under Habit (general appearance) and "3-6 ft." under Size Characteristics to get a list of more than 70 shrubs within that size category.   You can also search by size class if you use any of the lists on our RECOMMENDED SPECIES page by using the NARROW YOUR SEARCH in the side bar when you open any of the lists.  Size Notes, on the other hand, gives you information about the size of the particular species for that page.  For instance, on the page for Juniperus ashei (Ashe juniper) you see that it is in the 12-36 ft. Size Class and its Size Notes say "Rarely grows over 30 feet tall."  You will probably notice that most plants have data for the Size Class, but some do not have data for Size Notes since those are more specific.  As we learn the specifics of the size of individual species they are added to the Native Plant Database.

 

More General Botany Questions

Native North American bulbs
August 19, 2011 - I saw your list of 4 lilies native to the Northeastern United States, which was very helpful. What other bulbs are native to North America? Although I garden in Connecticut, I am interested in learn...
view the full question and answer

Process of transpiration in plants
November 21, 2005 - I'm in 6th grade and I have a science project to do and the question is, Do living plants give off moisture. The first part of my project is to explain how living plants give off moisture. I've chec...
view the full question and answer

Dictionary of botanical names
September 02, 2011 - I am looking for an online resource that will tell me what the botanical names mean, for example, Cornus florida. Why is it named that? Surely somewhere there is information that explains the meanin...
view the full question and answer

Can Condalia hookeri (Brasil or Bluewood condalia) self-pollinate?
May 07, 2014 - Good morning Mr. SP, I see from your description of Condalia hookeri that this species has bisexual flowers. Do you know if it is self-incompatible?
view the full question and answer

Do yuccas die after blooming?
October 11, 2010 - We have a blue yucca which was planted 2 years ago and is just now blooming with a tower of white flowers. Will the entire plant die after blooming as the century plants do? If so, is there a way to s...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center