En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
1 rating

Wednesday - August 15, 2012

From: Birmingham, AL
Region: Southeast
Topic: Privacy Screening
Title: Plants for a property line in Birmingham, AL
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I am looking for a plant to help establish a property line. Our neighbor's landscaping/mowing company has a large turnover, and the new employees always get confused about where the property line is because our property line is so close to our neighbor's house. We are constantly running them off our property doing things like pruning our crepe myrtles and weedeating our bank on which we are struggling to get groundcover plants to grow. And usually they don't speak English so it's difficult for them to understand what we're trying to tell them. If we planted something along the property line from the street to the back of the yard, hopefully they will get the message, but we don't want it to be anything large like a hedge. Do you have any suggestions? We are in Birmingham, AL.

ANSWER:

We assume that you have already explored the possibility that your neighbor could contact their landscaper and insist that the property line be observed? The problem with having landscapers, of course, is that the property owners may be gone during the day and there is no one there to remind the crew. We tried to think of some plants that would discourage the workers from passing over, and thought particularly of thorny or spiky plants. However, even they would have to start small and could easily be weedeaten or mowed or just tramped on. Plus, as the plants grew in width, they would probably extend over the property line and become "fair game" for the Fierce Landscapers.

So, just off the top of our head, how about a non-plant solution? Our first (and probably least expensive) idea would be to drive stakes, available at any hardware store, into the boundary line, and groove the top of each stake. This groove will hold heavy surveyor's rope in place as you stretch it from stake to stake. This surveyor's rope is often a bright color, yellow or red. Stakes not too far apart with the rope hanging loosely between them should make it quite clear, "This far and no farther."

Another thought which might be a little more labor intensive, but certainly no more expensive would be to dig a trench, say 6" wide, with the far edge on the property line. You could then fill it with a brightly covered gravel, river rocks, anything that would facilitate drainage, but not prevent mowing. Perhaps, especially until the gardeners get the idea, you might still want to add to the trench the stakes and rope. Another possibility for this fix is low, lightweight trellis-type fencing, which might be wood, plastic or vines. They are often available in hardware and garden shops to mark boundaries of flower beds. They won't last forever, but they are attractive and make the point very clear.

We believe all of those solutions will be less expensive and labor-intensive than buying, planting and watering plants.

We next searched the Internet on "marking property boundaries" and found this site.

From Homesteading Today Creative Ways to Mark Property Lines

After awhile, you could propably plant some attractive plants well within your boundaries and the landscapers would be used to the location.

 

 

More Privacy Screening Questions

Small tree with blossoms for screen in Corpus Christi, Texas
July 26, 2010 - We are looking for something to plant along a back fence for privacy but don't want it to be a bush. What might work like a crepe Myrtle in the Corpus Christi area that would blossom towards the to...
view the full question and answer

Fast-growing evergreen shrub/tree as a screening fence
January 25, 2008 - Our commercially-zoned property is adjacent to a residential area. The city planning and zoning board has said okay to a vegetation boundary instead of a fence for blocking headlights. The requireme...
view the full question and answer

Vines for fence in Bentonville, Arkansas
June 12, 2013 - I have about 600 LF of 8ft high chain link fence I would like to grow vines on in Northwest Arkansas for screening. I would like some to cover quickly but be maintenance friendly. I heard alternating ...
view the full question and answer

Plant mistakes from Cedar Park, TX
April 09, 2014 - At our "Wilts End" in Cedar Park, TX. and are looking for a tall shrub/tree that will hide a 6-ft tall concrete wall and muffle the noise from a busy street. The wall forms a very wide-angled V shap...
view the full question and answer

Need suggestions for plants to form a privacy hedge in Granbury, TX.
April 14, 2011 - We live on a rocky hill in Hood County, Tx. and need suggestions for evergreen anything that will provide privacy. Red Cedars were added in October 2010 and it looks as if half of those are dying. He...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center