Rent Shop Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Thursday - July 05, 2012

From: Austin, TX
Region: Select Region
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Non-native Lavender Problem in Austin, TX
Answered by: Joe Marcus

QUESTION:

I am having a problem with two of my lavender plants and was hoping I could send a photo of each to get your opinion. I've been growing rosemary and lavender successfully for quite sometime and am aware that typically the problem is too much water or not enough soil drainage but one plant was in a pot that seemed like it had too many drainage homes in it so I planted it in the ground where I have several rosemary plant doing well and it got even worse. The leaves are turning grey, then brown. My other lavender plant is in a pit it's been in for quite a long time and had been doing great. In fact where it was previously, I was worried it got too much sprinkler action but it was thriving. I moved to the front yard to an equally sunny spot and the longer older leaves seem to be turning yellow, then brown. From research that seems to be a typical sign of too much water but it's getting less water now than previously. The first specimen I spoke of is almost dead and might be a lost cause but I'd sure like to know what I'm doing wrong!

ANSWER:

We're very sorry, but we are not the correct resource to find answers to the questions you're asking.  Although the Lavenders (Lavendula spp.) are fairly well-adapted to central Texas, many people don't realize that none of the species are native to North America.  The focus of research and the extent of expertise of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is limited to those plant native to North America.

An excellent resource for identification and culture information for non-native plants is the user forums of the Botanical Garden at the University of British Columbia.  Another resource is your county's AgriLife Extension Service agent.

 

More Non-Natives Questions

Erosion control in Spicewood TX
March 20, 2013 - I am from a small community along the Colorado River a few miles East of Marble Falls. We are looking for a ground cover/grass to prevent erosion on on our beach front. We had planned to use Bermuda G...
view the full question and answer

Non-native hylocereus undatus for Austin
February 24, 2012 - Can we plant Hylocereus (Dragon Fruit) here in Austin, TX? We are going to have a large xeriscape bed and want to know what all we can put in it. We are new to Texas so we have no clue what grows here...
view the full question and answer

Japanese lilac trees in Lehi UT
July 31, 2010 - Dear Mr. Smarty Pants, We live in Utah and this past spring planted three Japanese Lilac Trees in the lawn next to the deck hoping they would one day provide some shade. They are planted in full sun ...
view the full question and answer

Response to previous answer on non-native cacti
March 15, 2008 - Hi Mr. SmartyPlants, Santa Barbara here, again. Thanks for all your effort, especially as it falls outside of the Center's general expertise. That Cacti.com is amazing and I found the answer in the...
view the full question and answer

Why is non-native peach tree not going dormant in Owensville IN
December 19, 2011 - I have a peach tree I grew from a peach pit. It is about 2 years old. I planted the tree in my yard this summer. It is now about 3' tall. My problem is it is not going dormant. We have had several fr...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.