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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
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Sunday - June 24, 2012

From: Buda, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Invasive Plants, Non-Natives, Diseases and Disorders, Trees
Title: Splitting bark on non-native mimosa from Buda TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

What would cause my Mimosa tree to have splitting bark. I've only lived in this house for 8 months and am learning about this tree. The other tree seems fine. It looks as though it split and then tried to grow back like a scab.

ANSWER:

Albizia julibrissin is a species of legume in the genus Albizia, native to southwestern and eastern Asia, from Persia east to China and Korea. It is also widely known as "Mimosa" and "Persian silk tree."

As such, it falls out of the realm of expertise of Mr. Smarty Plants. The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, home of Mr. Smarty Plants, is dedicated to the growth, propagation and protection of plants native not only to North America but also to areas in which the plant grows naturally.

From the University of Florida Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants, here is an article about the invasiveness of this non-native plant.

Here is an article on Mimosa Wilt, blaming splitting bark on a fungus. An e-How website discusses Mimosa Tree Diseases, again mentioning fusarium wilt.

 

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