En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Saturday - May 19, 2012

From: Albuquerque, NM
Region: Southwest
Topic: Plant Identification
Title: Identity of rejuvenated plant
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I am having trouble identifying my plant which has lived at least two years now, often looking completely dead, actually hibernating for a few weeks then bursting back to life. Small sprouts that grow with long stems with big green leaves with white spots which become too heavy for the long stems which fall over, bend, break, and die. I was going to dump it and put a cactus in it's place the 1st time he hibernated and discovered a bunch of bulbs with obviously healthy long roots on the bottoms of them. Put him back and business as usual. What is he? How do I care for him better?

ANSWER:

From your description it sounds as if your plant is/was growing in a pot and the description of the leaves do not bring any plant readily to mind nor is there enough detail to enable us to do a search in our Native Plant Database; therefore, I doubt that it is a North American native plant.  And, since our focus and expertise here at the Wildflower Center are with plants native to North America, we aren't the ones to be asking about its identity or its care.  Just in case you think it is a native plant, you could try doing a COMBINATION SEARCH in our Native Plant Database by choosing "New Mexico" in the Select State or Province and then selecting other appropriate criteria that fits your plant.  You could then look at the photos of the plants on the resulting list.  However, I think your best bet for learning the identity of this plant is the take photos and send them to one of the several plant identification forums that will accept photos of plants for identification.  You can find links to these plant identification forums on our Plant Identification page.

 

More Plant Identification Questions

Identification of possible toxic plant in Austin, TX
June 20, 2014 - When we hike with our dogs along Turkey Creek in Austin, they seem to make a bee line to a small green leafy plant when they find it along the trail and eat a few leaves of it. We assume it's not dan...
view the full question and answer

Information about plant called Josephs tears, possibly Jobs tears (Coix lacryma-jobi)
October 08, 2007 - I recently received a plant and was told it was a succulent called Joseph's Tears. According to the individual who gave it to me, during the month of September it develops a little growth at the tip...
view the full question and answer

Plant Identification
July 14, 2011 - What is the common purple flower found in fields that has a yellow flattened oval berry like pod after blooming? Leaves are grayish green. I am thinking in the nightshade family? It is a bane to a pas...
view the full question and answer

Identification of spiny plant in Yucca Mesa, CA
March 02, 2011 - I have a very prickly bush on my property near Yucca Mesa, CA, (high desert). 2 to 3 feet high. Branches mostly starting from the center near ground. Lots of 1 to 2 inch spines on branches. Dormant in...
view the full question and answer

Identification of two Solanum species in Thorndale, Texas
November 01, 2010 - Hi. NE of Austin in the Taylor/Rockdale area with sandy loam I have two kinds of nightshade. One has the deep rhizomes and stickers and is relatively small and weedy. The other, very similar in app...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center