En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Saturday - May 19, 2012

From: Albuquerque, NM
Region: Southwest
Topic: Plant Identification
Title: Identity of rejuvenated plant
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I am having trouble identifying my plant which has lived at least two years now, often looking completely dead, actually hibernating for a few weeks then bursting back to life. Small sprouts that grow with long stems with big green leaves with white spots which become too heavy for the long stems which fall over, bend, break, and die. I was going to dump it and put a cactus in it's place the 1st time he hibernated and discovered a bunch of bulbs with obviously healthy long roots on the bottoms of them. Put him back and business as usual. What is he? How do I care for him better?

ANSWER:

From your description it sounds as if your plant is/was growing in a pot and the description of the leaves do not bring any plant readily to mind nor is there enough detail to enable us to do a search in our Native Plant Database; therefore, I doubt that it is a North American native plant.  And, since our focus and expertise here at the Wildflower Center are with plants native to North America, we aren't the ones to be asking about its identity or its care.  Just in case you think it is a native plant, you could try doing a COMBINATION SEARCH in our Native Plant Database by choosing "New Mexico" in the Select State or Province and then selecting other appropriate criteria that fits your plant.  You could then look at the photos of the plants on the resulting list.  However, I think your best bet for learning the identity of this plant is the take photos and send them to one of the several plant identification forums that will accept photos of plants for identification.  You can find links to these plant identification forums on our Plant Identification page.

 

More Plant Identification Questions

Identification of a vine with red berries in Weatherford, Texas
October 17, 2014 - I have found a vine with red berries that I would appreciate an ID for. How can I send you a photo or two of it?
view the full question and answer

Identificaation of volunteer plant in Maine
July 31, 2007 - I have a volunteer in my garden in Maine that I have been unable to identify. It is a perennial that grows in full sun. It has formed a thick mat of plants whose leaves are about and its leaves are d...
view the full question and answer

Plant Identification
April 16, 2009 - I have a vine in my flowerbed that has three leaves and thorns and it looks like poison ivy. How can I tell if it is?
view the full question and answer

Help identify a plant.
February 21, 2008 - Could you help me to identify this plant?
view the full question and answer

Identification of plant growing with purchased plant
September 23, 2013 - I purchased a heurchera and there was another plant that was growing in the pot with it. I planted both together in my garden. The "other" plant is growing and none of the gardeners around here has ...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2016 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center