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Wednesday - June 06, 2012

From: Grand Prairie, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Plant Identification
Title: Plant similar to a cattail
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I don't know where this plant grows normally, but I am looking for a plant that is similar to a cat tail, but the petals are not feathery, they are red and waxy and the petals are round almost. Please help. I am trying to find a plant like this for my mom. Thank you.

ANSWER:

First of all, I am not sure if you are talking about the plants named cattails—Typha domingensis (Southern cattail) and Typha latifolia (Broadleaf cattail)—or plants that have a blossom or leaves similar to the tail of a feline.  At any rate, neither possibility brings to mind a native North American plant to me—our expertise and focus are with plants native to North America.   I think your best bet is to visit a very good nursery and describe and possibly draw a picture of the plant you are looking for.   It is very likely that the plant you are looking for is not a native plant and perhaps conversation with a nursery person could give them a good idea about what the plant is.

 

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