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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Thursday - May 03, 2012

From: Kerrville, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: General Botany, Non-Natives
Title: Kerrville Soil for Vegetables
Answered by: Brigid & Larry Larson

QUESTION:

We are moving to our vacation home in Kerrville, TX and plan on putting in a vegetable garden on the sunny north side of our house. I'm assuming that your answer to the person inquiring about "soil improvement in Kerrville" would also apply to our situation, but since we're wanting to grow vegetables and not flowers, I thought there might be some slight differences in your response. We, of course, would have the same native soil content as the other person.

ANSWER:

Well..... Officially Mr Smarty Plants doesn't do vegetables, check out this earlier response!  Now that the official party line is stated we [shush] grow and eat them happily, but don't claim any expertise.

To be clear, here's our older answer. In comparison to that, vegetables, as non-natives, will likely need richer soil and more care. I'd be adding more compost and perhaps being a bit more selective as to it's origins [I do intend to eat the produce after all].  It would be a good idea to get your soil tested for nutrients.  Good references that are supposed to know about local gardening conditions include a gardening club and/or the local extension office.  Here's a listing for the local gardening club and here is the webpage for the Kerr County Extension Office.

 

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