En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Wednesday - April 11, 2012

From: Monroe, NY
Region: Northeast
Topic: Non-Natives, Shrubs
Title: Non-native photinias in Monroe NY
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Two Questions: Is the weather too cold to plant red tip photinias in Monroe NY? What is a good alternative evergreen shrub to hide chain link fence?

ANSWER:

From an article from Mississippi State University:

"Red-Tip Photinias Almost Eliminated:

Ten years ago, one of the most popular shrubs in the South was the Red-tip Photinia (Photinia fraseri). Everybody wanted this handsome evergreen shrub and it was widely grown by Southern nursery growers for use in both commercial and residential landscapes.

Red-tip is a wonderful, large, evergreen shrub with attractive foliage and showy white flowers. Its claim to fame is brilliant red new foliage that appears in the spring.

Nevertheless, in the last ten years or so, Red-tip has gone from the top of the list to the bottom due to intense pressure from a devastating fungal disease.

Red-tip is highly susceptible to the fungal pathogen known as Entomosporium that causes leaf spots and ultimately defoliation. The disease has all but eliminated Red-tip from the list of recommended shrubs for Southern landscapes. In fact, the disease is so widespread that one plant pathologist jokingly explained that there are two types of Red-tip, those that have the disease and those that are going to get it! So, even though newly planted Red-tip bushes may stay disease free for many years, ultimately they will succumb to the inevitable."

You will notice this refers to "Southern Landscapes," so we went hunting for the USDA Hardiness Zones in which it can live. Orange County, NY, at the northern edge of the New York Metropolitan area, is in USDA Hardiness Zone 6a, with average annual minimum temperatures of -10 to -5 deg. F. From this Dave's Garden article on the plant, we learned that the photinia needs USDA Hardiness Zones from 7a to 9b. You might also be interested in reading some of the comments from others who have raised it.

Since the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is dedicated to the growth, protection and propagation of plants native not only to North America but to the areas in which the plant normally grows, this will not be in our Native Plant Database. Red-tip photinia is native to warm temperate Asia from the Himalaya east to Japan and south to India and Thailand.

So, we will search our Native Plant Database for evergreen shrubs native to New York. There will not be a lot of choices in your climate, but we found 6 possibilities. Since you did not designate a height or amount of sunlight, you will need to read the complete description of each plant in our Native Plant Database. Click the link on each plant to go to our webpage on that plant for information.

Evergreen Shrubs for New York:

Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (Kinnikinnick)

Ilex glabra (Inkberry)

Leucothoe fontanesiana (Drooping leucothoe)

Ledum groenlandicum (Bog labrador tea)

Mahonia aquifolium (Holly-leaf oregon-grape)

Rhododendron maximum (Great laurel)

 

From the Image Gallery


Kinnikinnick
Arctostaphylos uva-ursi

Inkberry
Ilex glabra

Highland doghobble
Leucothoe fontanesiana

Bog labrador tea
Ledum groenlandicum

Hollyleaved barberry
Mahonia aquifolium

Great laurel
Rhododendron maximum

More Shrubs Questions

Problems with yellow lantana in Smoaks SC
June 05, 2010 - My yellow lantanas are about five years old - big and beautiful, but beginning last year, the blooms are small and part of the tiny petals are brown or black. Can you tell me what I can do about this ...
view the full question and answer

Shrubs for New Hampshire
June 25, 2009 - Will be landscaping next Spring: Do you think using 'Ilex Crenata'-Japanese Holly together with variegated Euonymus (species: fortunei) as shrub hedges in front of our house is a good combo? Do they...
view the full question and answer

Native plants for screen in Colleyville TX
March 12, 2009 - My soil is pure sand that goes down as far as I can dig. I am needing native plants to use as a screen, that grow to be 6-10 ft. tall. Also, since my plantings dry out so quickly, would it be helpfu...
view the full question and answer

Plants for area around salt water pool
June 27, 2013 - What are some plants that will grow around my salt water pool where there is some salt water runoff occasionally.
view the full question and answer

Duplicate of English holly for Eufaula OK
January 03, 2010 - I wish to have a shrub that would duplicate the red berries and foliage of English holly. Tolerance of cultivation is also desired.
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2015 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center