En EspaŅol
Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Mr. Smarty Plants - Decline ot Heartleaf rosemallow from Austin

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Monday - March 26, 2012

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Compost and Mulch, Planting, Watering, Shrubs
Title: Decline ot Heartleaf rosemallow from Austin
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

My tulipan del monte -a new small plant from the wildflower center--did great all winter and was forming a new flower bud, just died in a matter of a few days. It looks like it "dried up", no visible damage, nothing broken, or eaten, but it has gotten plenty of moisture with our recent rains. Could it have gotten too much water? It's in regular garden soil, Austin, not clay.

ANSWER:

Hibiscus martianus (Heartleaf rosemallow)

The only thing that has truly changed since you purchased that plant in (we assume) the Fall Plant Sale, is that the rains have come back. Our best guess is that the plant did not have good enough drainage, which was okay when there wasn't any water anyway, but with the rains came the possibility of water standing on the roots of that plant. As you can see from this USDA Plant Profile, it grows naturally on the coast of South Texas. If we sold it in our Plant Sale, that means that our Garden staff were confident that it would thrive in Austin, but of course, when you bought it we were still in the grips of a drought.

From our webpage on this page (which read by following the plant link above) we found this information:

"Heartleaf hibiscus has spectacular flowers two and three inches across. It is a wonderful, small, drought-tolerant hibiscus from South Texas. For it to successfully winter in Austin, mulch or protect it adequately. Grows well in a container or in the ground."

We don't think we had enough cold last winter for this plant to suffer without mulch, but then, in comparison with South Texas, maybe we did. It is such a nice plant, with virtually year-round flowering in the right conditions, we are going to suggest desperate measures. Plants are tough, and this one may still be alive. Now, before it starts getting too hot, we suggest you carefully dig it back up, getting all the roots you can. Trim it back some, you may even hit some green wood, which definitely means it is alive and if you see any obviously rotted roots, trim them off, too, but leave as much root as you can. Next dig a bigger hole, and mix the native dirt with a good percentage of good quality compost. This not only will assist in drainage, but will help the tiny little rootlets that we hope will start to grow to access the trace minerals and nutrients they need from the soil. Do not fertilize. Native plants rarely need fertilization anyway, and no plant under stress (which this one obviously is) should be fertilized. Get it back in the ground, allowing the compost to heighten the planting spot, again helping with drainage. Stick a hose down in that soft soil and let the water dribble very slowly until water comes to the surface. Do that about once a week, at least until you can tell if it is established and alive. And mulch it right away, the mulch will help protect the roots from heat and cold, and as it decomposes will improve the texture of the soil.

It may not bloom again this year (after all, it's had a hard year, being dead and all), but we think it may come back in the Fall. Basically, we could blame this on transplant shock, which kills a lot of new plants. But transplant shock has many different causes, we just hope we found the right cause for your problem.

 

From the Image Gallery


Heartleaf rosemallow
Hibiscus martianus

More Watering Questions

Cedar trees dying in CO
July 18, 2011 - We have mature cedar trees at the home we bought in SW Colorado. The large ones have begun to die. Can too much water kill a cedar tree and is there anything I can do to keep them alive?
view the full question and answer

Copper Canyon daisy leaves turning yellow in Spring Branch TX
September 01, 2010 - My Copper Canyon daisies have grown well this year but the leaves are turning yellow. Any ideas?
view the full question and answer

Native plants for sandy soil and not much water
April 14, 2008 - I am planning a new garden at home and would like to grow native plants that can handle sandy soil and don't need much water. I do not water my gardens.I would prefer plants that can have more than o...
view the full question and answer

Yucca rostrata needs some help in Austin, TX.
September 16, 2013 - We planted an expensive 5-6 foot Yucca rostrata last fall. It bloomed beautifully in the spring. We installed an irrigation link to water the recently planted areas with succulents, viburnums, spart...
view the full question and answer

Native New Jersey plants to remove iron water from Lawrenceville NJ
October 20, 2012 - Are there any native New Jersey plants that can remove iron water
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center