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Mr. Smarty Plants - Identity of rubbery-looking tree with long green thorns

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Wednesday - March 21, 2012

From: Conroe, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Invasive Plants, Non-Natives, Plant Identification
Title: Identity of rubbery-looking tree with long green thorns
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I am trying to identify a tree that has a green rubbery look with long, sharp, green thorns. This tree is on my property in Conroe, TX and the soil type is Gladwater clay frequently flooded.

ANSWER:

This sound like Poncirus trifoliata [syn. Citrus trifoliata] (trifoliate orange).  It is native to China and Korea and is considered invasive in North America.  Here are more photos and information.

 

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