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Sunday - March 25, 2012

From: Driftwood, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Planting, Herbs/Forbs, Wildflowers
Title: Flowers for an August wedding in Driftwood TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford


For an August 4th wedding in Driftwood, Texas we want fragrant flowers and wildflowers that we can grow in our garden. We have four raised beds (12 ft. x 6 ft.) in a fenced area in which we've grown vegetables in the past. Now the beds are empty and we want to plant some flowers that will be blooming by the end of July. Note: we have usually had a strong SE wind blowing by mid-afternoon in previous years. Any suggestions?


Were you planning to cut the flower for bouquets, or are they to remain in the garden as a backdrop to the ceremony? We ask this because it is about 6 months too late to have wildflowers planted from seed blooming on August 4, unless the wedding date is August 4, 2013. Most of the popular Texas wildflowers are Spring-bloomers, they plant themselves (or are planted by gardeners) in the Fall. The Spring rains (if we get them) allow the seeds to germinate, they grow, bloom and, in the case of annuals, put out seeds and die. Perennials ordinarily do not bloom until the second season for blooming so that puts the date at August 4, 2014. Sorry, we don't make the rules, Nature does.

There is a chance that you might be able to achieve your purpose because you live in Central Texas. The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center will be having its Spring Plant Sale in April. Our plants will all be native to this area, and many will be blooming or will bloom by August. It wouldn't be nearly as inexpensive as buying seeds in September and planting them, but it's really the only way you are going to get native flowers for your wedding. We are going to go to the Plant Sale list, select on "herb" (herbaceous blooming plant) and August for bloom time.

Now, full disclosure: Again, this will not be cheap. You will have to measure your space and estimate what you are going to need to cover it. Determine the sun requirements for all parts of the garden and choose plants appropriate to those areas. Make a map so you won't forget which goes where. If you have deer in the area (and you probably do) don't plant that garden. The day after the plants go in, or the morning of the wedding, you will discover nothing but stems; deer loooove fresh tender young flowers. All these plants should go into the ground as quickly as possible and be watered carefully. In other words, you have a big job ahead of you to achieve the "garden in your head."

August-blooming flowers for Central Texas:

Berlandiera lyrata (Chocolate daisy)

Capsicum annuum (Chile pequin)

Calylophus berlandieri (Berlandier's sundrops)

Conoclinium greggii (Gregg's mistflower)

Echinacea purpurea (Eastern purple coneflower)

Eryngium leavenworthii (Leavenworth's eryngo)

Eustoma exaltatum ssp. russellianum (Texas bluebells)

Gaillardia pulchella (Firewheel)

Helianthus maximiliani (Maximilian sunflower)

Machaeranthera tanacetifolia (Tanseyleaf tansyaster)

Melampodium leucanthum (Blackfoot daisy)

Monarda fistulosa (Wild bergamot)


From the Image Gallery

Chocolate daisy
Berlandiera lyrata

Chile pequin
Capsicum annuum

Berlandier's sundrops
Calylophus berlandieri

Gregg's mistflower
Conoclinium greggii

Eastern purple coneflower
Echinacea purpurea

Leavenworth's eryngo
Eryngium leavenworthii

Texas bluebells
Eustoma exaltatum ssp. russellianum

Gaillardia pulchella

Maximilian sunflower
Helianthus maximiliani

Tahoka daisy
Machaeranthera tanacetifolia

Blackfoot daisy
Melampodium leucanthum

Wild bergamot
Monarda fistulosa

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