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Saturday - July 15, 2006

From: Fairfield, PA
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Non-native, invasive mimosa trees
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I have a mimosa tree. The blooms on mine are very pale while I see many other trees with bright blooms. Is there anyway to change the color of the blooms? For instance, is the color due to the PH of the soil like a hydrangea?

ANSWER:

Mimosa or silk tree (Albizia julibrissin) is a native of Asia and is considered invasive in the east and southeast United States. There are several color varieties. The most common color is pink which can vary from deep pink to pale pink. There are also white versions. As far as we know, it is genetics that is responsible for the colors, not environmental conditions. So, the only way for you to get a deeper pink color is to get a different tree.
 

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