En Español

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Thursday - March 22, 2012

From: San Dimas , CA
Region: California
Topic: Non-Natives, Pollinators, Shrubs
Title: Alternative for Pittosporum limelight
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Is it ok to plant a Pittosporum limelight by pool? Don't want bees! Needs to be 6 feet. Thanks.

ANSWER:

Pittosporum tenuifolium (limelight) is native to New Zealand.   The focus and expertise of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center are plants native to North America so we wouldn't recommend planting this shrub.  We can offer some shrubs with similar features that are native alternatives:

Arctostaphylos manzanita (Whiteleaf manzanita) and here are photos and more information

Baccharis pilularis (Coyotebrush) and here are more photos and information

Cercocarpus montanus var. minutiflorus [syn.  Cercocarpus minutiflorus] (Smooth mountain mahogany) and here are photos and more information.

Frangula californica [syn. Rhamnus californica] (California buckthorn or coffeeberry) and here are photos and more information.

Most flowering plants are pollinated by some insect or other—many times it will be bees.  This means that your plant, even Pittosporum limelight, will be visited by insects while in bloom—probably, this will include bees.

 

From the Image Gallery


Coyotebrush
Baccharis pilularis

Alderleaf mountain mahogany
Cercocarpus montanus

More Non-Natives Questions

Root growth on non-native Pittisporum Tobira from San Francisco
October 29, 2011 - How do the roots grow and spread for the Pittosporum Tobira shrub? I have one that is about 20 feet tall and wonder how to care for it? Do you have a picture of how the roots grow?
view the full question and answer

Do Salvia coccinea and Salvia occidentalis occur in Hawaii
April 27, 2008 - Aloha, Would you please happen to know if the salvia occidentalis and the salvia coccinea are growing in a wild state in Hawaii, the quantity (small or large areas? What are the weather conditions ...
view the full question and answer

Transporting a plant on airplane from New York City
April 21, 2012 - Can I transport via airplane a jade plant from New York City to Colorado in my suitcase?
view the full question and answer

Difficulty with Clay Soil from Palm Bay, FL
August 22, 2012 - I had a very nice little native shady area behind my house for over 40 years, but now it has been cleared except for a 100 foot tall live oak in the center of this raised mound (50' x 80'). I've be...
view the full question and answer

Plant replacements for non-native invasives in Austin, TX
April 20, 2007 - I live in Austin, TX, I have a large lot and small house. I want to do some selective planting on the back half of my lot. Currently there are large live oaks, cedar elm. hackberry, cedar, Texas persi...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2016 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center